Courses, Training & Qualifications - Basic Life Support Courses & Training - Online Basic Life Support E-LEarning Courses - UK Certified - Basic Life Support Training Courses Online - BLS CPDUK Certified - Online Resuscitation and Basic Life Support Training Courses - E-Learning Courses - Online Basic Life Support (BLS) Training Courses - Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Training Online

Basic Life Support Courses & Training Online - UK Accredited BLS eLearning

The Mandatory Training Group is the leading UK provider of accredited basic life support (BLS), cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and automated external defibrillator (AED) courses, including adult, paediatric & newborn resuscitation training courses and certification.

Click here to browse MTG E-Learning courses, including basic life support courses and training for neonates, newborn children, paediatrics and adults.

Basic Life Support Courses & Training Providers - The Mandatory Training Group UK -

Click here to see our CPD Certification Service accreditation for our basic life support training courses and programmes.

What is basic life support?

Basic life support is a level of medical care that is used for victims of life-threatening illnesses or injuries until they can be given full medical care by advanced life support providers. It can be provided by trained medical personnel, such as emergency medical technicians, and by qualified bystanders.

What is covered in the basic life support training course?

Basic Life Support training is mandatory for registered nurses and healthcare assistants but is beneficial to all. The syllabus follows the guidelines of the Resuscitation Council (UK) and includes the use of an automated external defibrillator (AED) and the DRABCD approach to resuscitation.

What do you mean by basic life support?

Basic Life Support, or BLS, generally refers to the type of care that first-responders, healthcare providers and public safety professionals provide to anyone who is experiencing cardiac arrest, respiratory distress or an obstructed airway.

Is basic life support the same as CPR?

Basic life support courses are typically more in-depth and complex and are based on working in teams with other professional rescuers in the medical field, whereas CPR training teaches you the essentials about performing the CPR technique on a family member or co-worker as a single rescuer.

What is the main purpose of basic life support?

Basic life support consists of a number of medical procedures provided to patients with life-threatening conditions of the body, that cause pain or dysfunction to the person. All these techniques are focused on helping patients sustain life until more precise medical treatment can begin.

Online Basic Life Support Courses & Training Providers UK (Accredited BLS E-Learning Courses)

MTG E-Learning provides a wide range of online training courses, eLearning programmes and Ofqual qualifications, including basic life support training courses in all UK regions.

Click here to find out more about MTG eLearning courses, including basic life support courses and training programmes in the UK.

Basic Life Support (BLS)

The AHA’s BLS course trains participants to promptly recognize several life-threatening emergencies, give high-quality chest compressions, deliver appropriate ventilations and provide early use of an AED. Reflects science and education from the American Heart Association Guidelines Update for CPR and Emergency Cardiovascular Care (ECC).

Who should take this course?

The AHA’s BLS Course is designed for healthcare professionals and other personnel who need to know how to perform CPR and other basic cardiovascular life support skills in a wide variety of in-facility and prehospital settings.

Resuscitation Council UK Compliant Basic Life Support (BLS) Training Courses

BLS Courses Online for the UK - Get Certified Now in the UK

Professional Online BLS Course for UK work requirements. Only £24.95. Courses Start At £24.95. Meets UK/HSE Guidelines. Get BLS Certified Now. Engaging & Exceptional. Easy Video-Based Training. Services: Online Courses, Continuing Support, Printable Certificates - BLS CoursesGroup Discount Specials - Basic Life Support Course - £24.99 - + VAT.

Information on CPR/BLS Courses - Resuscitation Council Compliant BLS Courses

The Resuscitation Council (UK) is respected nationally and internationally for the provision of high quality, evidence-based, resuscitation training and training materials for healthcare professionals.

Basic Life Support Training Courses - UK Resus Council Recognised E-learning

The Level One Basic Life Support Course addresses the most common emergencies that a first aider may face. The course meets the latest guidelines from the Resuscitation Council (UK) - basic-life-support-half-day-course.

Basic Life Support Training - BLS Training for Nurses and Healthcare Professionals

Basic Life Support Training Course, Basic Life Support training is mandatory for registered nurses and healthcare assistants but is beneficial to all.

Basic Life Support (BLS) Level 2 (VTQ) Course - The Resuscitation Council (UK) Compliant

Online and classroom course in Basic Life Support (BLS) Level 2 (VTQ) for anyone in the UK. Online course for only £24.95 + VAT.

Basic Life Support Video Training Courses UK

Can basic life support training be done online?

Yes, this course can be taken virtually.

Is BLS Online acceptable?

Currently, the AHA does not accredit, approve, nor endorse any fully online BLS or CPR certification or renewal course, so the answer is no. The AHA requires an in-person, hands-on- skills assessment as a part of their certification program, and that is not possible online.

What is the value of online basic life support training?

Basic life support consists of a number of medical procedures provided to patients with life-threatening conditions of the body, that cause pain or dysfunction to the person. All these techniques are focused on helping patients or sustaining life until more precise medical treatment can begin.

Do you provide basic life support induction training courses?

The Mandatory Training Group provides induction courses covering the Resuscitation Council UK learning outcomes. Rapid response to emergency situations can save lives, making life support training critically important for healthcare staff.

Are your basic life support eLearning courses suitable for NHS nurses and doctors?

Basic Life Support training is mandatory for registered nurses and healthcare assistants but is beneficial to all. The syllabus follows the guidelines of the Resuscitation Council (UK) and includes the use of an automated external defibrillator (AED) and the DRABCD approach to resuscitation training.

Are your basic life support e-learning courses Resuscitation Council UK recognised?

The Level One Basic Life Support Course addresses the most common emergencies that a first aider may face. The course meets the latest guidelines from The Resuscitation Council (UK).

Do your basic life support online training courses meet the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) guidelines?

Yes, all of The Mandatory Training Group's basic life support and CPR courses are compliant with the latest European Resuscitation Council (ERC) guidelines.

Do your basic life support and CPR courses meet the guidelines for clinical practice and training in primary care?

The Mandatory Training Group's online CPR and basic life support training courses meet the Resuscitation Council UK guidance for clinical and non-clinical staff in primary care.

Are you basic life support (BLS) half-day refresher training courses Skills for Health Aligned?

This face-to-face training (refresher) course covers both the practical and theory-based elements of Basic Life Support. You will learn how to perform chest compressions and rescue breaths in line with the Skills for Health's UK Core Skills Training Framework (CSTF).

How long does the refresher basic life support training course take?

Basic Life Support Training Course. Resuscitation training normally takes place over three hours and includes the necessary theory followed by lots of practical activities.

Where can I find accredited online basic life support training courses?

View all details on Basic Life Support Level 2 – Online Training Course – CPD Accredited - Resuscitation course on The Mandatory Training Group UK website, the UK's #1 basic life support training site.

What do your basic life support and first aid online training courses include?

Providers of Emergency First Aid And Basic Life Support Training and Courses, including:

  • Defibrillator Training
  • Life Skills
  • CPR
  • Paediatrics.

Online Basic Life Support Courses & Training Providers UK

Basic Life Support Courses & Training Providers NHS

Immediate Life Support Courses & Training Providers

Paediatric Basic Life Support Courses & Training Providers

Newborn Basic Life Support Courses & Training Providers

Neonatal Basic Life Support Courses & Training Providers

Free Basic Life Support Training Courses

Frequently asked questions about basic life support training

Click on the links below to find out the most frequently asked questions about basic life support training, resuscitation and automated external defibrillators.

What are the 4 elements of basic life support?

The four elements of basic life support (BLS) are:

  1. Checking for danger
  2. Initial assessment
  3. Airway maintenance and breathing
  4. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR).

When approaching a casualty, an initial casualty assessment should be conducted; this initial assessment is called a primary survey.

Can BLS be done online?

At The Mandatory Training Group, BLS online courses are easy to access and easy to complete. Online BLS classes are divided into interactive modules that you can take as your schedule permits.

Does BLS cover first aid?

While some of the training does overlap with First Aid, like the initial scene size up and patient assessment, the BLS Certification Course does not generally cover First Aid training specifically.

How long is BLS good for?

BLS cards are valid for two years from the date on your certificate. If your American Red Cross BLS certification is about to expire (or has expired and you're within 30 days of its expiration), you can enroll in an abbreviated BLS course (a review course) and get recertified for two more years.

What is basic life support training?

BLS refers to the basic first aid procedures that can be used to keep someone alive until the emergency medical services can get to the scene. The most important skills are chest compressions to pump blood around the body, and rescue breaths to provide oxygen.

What does BLS stand for?

BLS stands for Basic Life Support.

What does basic life support training include?

Training that includes Healthcare Provider level skills such as 2-person CPR, pulse checks, bag valve mask use, and rescue breathing without compressions for people that have a pulse. Countries outside of the United States will often use the term BLS when referring to CPR training.

Does BLS count as CPR?

Basic life support (BLS) includes CPR but is an overall higher level of medical care typically administered by public safety professionals, first responders, paramedics, healthcare providers, and qualified bystanders.

Is BLS better than CPR?

“There is no difference between BLS and CPR,” he said. “BLS is an abbreviation for Basic Life Support. It is simply another term for CPR and leans towards meaning healthcare provider level.” ... “The American Heart Association certification for healthcare providers is titled, “BLS for Healthcare Providers”.

Is BLS a certification?

Earn your BLS certification from the American Red Cross. Whether you are a healthcare provider, are in school to become a nurse or physician, police officer, or firefighter, when you get BLS certified you can show your employer that you have the training you need to improve patient outcomes.

What are the steps of basic life support?

Procedure Steps

  1. Check for a response.
  2. Check the patients airway.
  3. Check for breathing and circulation.
  4. Recovery position.
  5. Begin chest compressions.
  6. Pinch nose and tilt head.
  7. Breathe into patient.

Who can take BLS?

Of course, anyone can get BLS certified. You'll be required to take a CPR course that is tailored to healthcare providers and professional rescuers and not for ordinary laypeople.

Where do you get the best BLS?

  • Babysitters
  • Dentists
  • EMTs
  • Lifeguards
  • Paramedics
  • Physical therapists
  • Police officers
  • Teachers.

What is the difference between BLS provider and BLS Renewal?

The Difference between BLS Certification and BLS Recertification. First-time certification courses can last up to 8 hrs while BLS recertification courses can last about half the time with the same trainer. BLS renewal also has fewer constraints when it comes to using online BLS certification companies.

Why is basic life support training important?

It can help people who are choking, drowning or are suffering from cardiac arrest, and it can make the difference between life and death for some people. BLS is included in all first aid training courses, along with related life-saving techniques and procedures such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

Why is it important to learn basic life support?

Basic life support consists of a number of medical procedures provided to patients with life-threatening conditions of the body that cause pain or dysfunction to the person. Learning medicine without placing patients at an increased risk of complications is of utmost importance in the medical profession.

Why is basic life support important in nursing?

Basic life support (BLS) is a crucial and potentially life-saving skillset for providing emergency treatment to a person experiencing a life-threatening illness until more advanced interventions can be performed. It's essential that all healthcare workers know how to correctly perform BLS.

What do you learn in basic life support?

You'll learn about adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation as well as child and infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation, how to use an automatic external defibrillator (AED) and what to do if someone's choking.

How effective is basic life support?

Early resuscitation can improve survival rates by up to 60%. Early resuscitation can improve survival rates by up to 60%.

What are the 4 main elements of basic life support?

The key elements of basic life support include:

  • Prompt recognition of cardiac arrest
  • Call for urgent medical assistance
  • Early effective CPR with an emphasis on minimal disruptions to compressions
  • Early defibrillation
  • Early advanced life support
  • Integrated post-cardiac arrest care.

What are the four main elements of basic life support?

It comprises the following elements: initial assessment, airway maintenance, expired air ventilation (rescue breathing; mouth-to-mouth ventilation) and chest compression. When all are combined the term cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is used.

What is basic life support commonly known as?

The letters CPR stand for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The term embraces all the procedures from basic first aid to the most advanced medical interventions that can be used to restore the breathing and circulation in someone whose heart and breathing have stopped. Rescue breaths are also known as 'mouth to mouth'.

How often should basic life support be done?

It is generally accepted that all staff should have annual updates, whether they are in primary dental or medical care and that training should include CPR for children. Research suggests that skills degrade after 3 to 6 months but to undertake training more often is often not practicable.

What percentage of resuscitations are successful?

Patients in previous studies have cited television as a large source of their belief that rates of survival after CPR vary between 19% and 75%, whereas actual rates of survival of CPR range from an average of 12% for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests to 24–40% for in-hospital arrests.

What are the 3 priorities of Life Support?

Basic life support comprises the following elements:

  1. Initial assessment
  2. Airway maintenance and breathing
  3. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR).

    Who can teach basic life support?

    They become full instructors after teaching two ERC courses. Candidates for this course may be healthcare professionals or lay people and must hold an ERC BLS/AED Provider certificate, and have been nominated from their provider course as having Instructor Potential (IP).

    What happens if you do CPR wrong?

    If you do CPR incorrectly you can injure the victim. If you perform CPR in the way that you were taught in class, you will reduce the risk of problems. However, some problems, such as broken ribs in the victim, may happen even if you do CPR the right way.

    Can you restart a heart with CPR?

    CPR alone is unlikely to restart the heart. Its main purpose is to restore the partial flow of oxygenated blood to the brain and heart. The objective is to delay tissue death and to extend the brief window of opportunity for a successful resuscitation without permanent brain damage.

    What are the six steps of basic life support?

    Check that the area is safe, then perform the following basic CPR steps:

    • Call 911 or ask someone else to.
    • Lay the person on their back and open their airway.
    • Check for breathing. ...
    • Perform 30 chest compressions.
    • Perform two rescue breaths.
    • Repeat until an ambulance or automated external defibrillator (AED) arrives.

    Who can perform basic life support?

    Basic Life Support, or BLS, generally refers to the type of care that first-responders, healthcare providers and public safety professionals provide to anyone who is experiencing cardiac arrest, respiratory distress or an obstructed airway.

    Do you need a qualification to teach BLS?

    All candidates looking to complete this online Adult Basic Life Support Train the Trainer Course should be suitably qualified and experienced in the healthcare and social care sectors. Good health and social care qualifications and experience include relevant experience working in a healthcare/social care setting.

    Who can train CPR?

    Many people take CPR instructor classes because they are required to hold the certification by their employer, but you don't have to go through a company in order to take the classes. Anyone can take them, even if you're an aspiring instructor rather than a working one.

    What do you need to be a BLS instructor?

    To become an AHA BLS Instructor requires several steps:

    • Complete the BLS Instructor Essentials
    • Complete the NIHE BLS Instructor Orientation
    • Complete the classroom BLS Instructor Course
    • Monitored student teaching at the BLS Instructor Course
    • Affiliate with an AHA Training Center.

    Is BLS first aid?

    Does BLS Certification Include First Aid? While some of the training does overlap with First Aid, like the initial scene size up and patient assessment, the BLS Certification Course does not generally cover First Aid training specifically.

    Can I teach BLS?

    This blended learning course combines online content with an in-person session for individuals seeking to become Basic Life Support instructors. Successful participants will receive a Basic Life Support Instructor certification and a Basic Life Support certification, both valid for 2 years.

    What is Level 3 Basic Life Support?

    Level 3 – Paediatric Immediate Life Support - Supported by the Resuscitation Council (UK) and aimed at staff who are registered Healthcare Professionals who work with children and infants.

    Can I teach CPR independently?

    Independent CPR instructors must have current CPR certifications in order to teach CPR to others. Earn a provider card for the type of CPR training you plan to instruct. For instance, if you plan to teach HeartSaver instruction to lifeguards, make sure you have a valid HeartSaver provider card.

    Can CPR teach online?

    At the American Red Cross, CPR online courses are simple to access and easy to complete. All that's required is a willingness to learn, internet access, and a laptop, desktop computer, tablet or smartphone. All you'll have to do to get started is sign up for a course.

    What is a BLS instructor?

    The American Heart Association BLS Instructor course trains healthcare professionals to teach American Heart Association BLS and Heartsaver courses.

    Can a CPR instructor teach BLS?

    The AHA requires that instructors be at least 18 years of age to teach Heartsaver and BLS courses. ACLS, PALS and PEARS Instructors must be at least 18 years of age and licensed or certified in a healthcare occupation where the skills are within the provider's scope of practice.

    Is BLS the same as first aid?

    Essentially, the term can be used to describe the primary (first) aid given to individuals suffering from both minor and life-threatening conditions. Thus, while CPR and BLS skills both broadly fall into the category of first aid, BLS and first aid should not be considered synonymous.

    Is BLS the same as CPR and first aid?

    While CPR and First Aid are designed for non-medical personnel, and BLS for people in a medical setting, anyone can take BLS if they’d like to go through more advanced medical training.

    Is the basic life support in first aid?

    Basic Life Support, or BLS, generally refers to the type of care that first-responders, healthcare providers and public safety professionals provide to anyone who is experiencing cardiac arrest, respiratory distress or an obstructed airway.

    Is BLS standard first aid?

    The Standard First Aid – Basic Life Support course is for those working in healthcare and covers advanced CPR techniques.

    Is BLS and Bcls the same thing?

    This American Heart Association BLS certification course is also called BCLS. BLS stands for Basic Life Support or BCLS stands for Basic Cardiac Life Support. The terminology of BCLS has been replaced by BLS but it is the same CPR class. The initials of AHA stand for American Heart Association.

    What is BLS in first aid?

    Basic Life Support (BLS) refers to a level of CPR training aimed at those working, or planning to work, in the healthcare field. The Workplace Standard First Aid – Basic Life Support course is for those working in healthcare and covers advanced CPR techniques.

    Does BLS count as CPR?

    Basic life support (BLS) includes CPR but is an overall higher level of medical care typically administered by public safety professionals, first responders, paramedics, healthcare providers, and qualified bystanders.

    Is BLS the same as Level C?

    Basic Life Support (BLS) is the foundation for saving lives after cardiac arrest. The new BLS Provider Course is equivalent to the BLS for Healthcare Providers (BLS for HCP) course it replaces.

    What does a BLS certification include?

    BLS stands for Basic Life Support. BLS certification may refer to two things: Training that includes Healthcare Provider level skills such as 2-person CPR, pulse checks, bag valve mask use, and rescue breathing without compressions for people that have a pulse.

    What does a BLS course consist of?

    BLS Basics The basic skills you’ll learn in a BLS provider course include single rescuer CPR, team-based CPR, choking relief, and AED operation for adults, children, and infants—all things you would need to resuscitate unresponsive victims or provide immediate treatment.

    What is Bcls certification for nurses?

    Nurses in every specialty need to complete a basic life support (BLS) certification as part of standardized training. This essential course will teach you fundamental life support skills and help you know how to respond in life-threatening emergencies.

    How long does BLS certification last?

    BLS cards are valid for two years from the date on your certificate. If your American Red Cross BLS certification is about to expire (or has expired and you’re within 30 days of its expiration), you can enroll in an abbreviated BLS course (a review course) and get recertified for two more years.

    Can I renew my BLS online?

    You can easily obtain your BLS recertification online through one of our recertification courses. The online BLS renewal course is approved for 2 CEUs/CMEs, and two hours is the amount of time you should expect to spend to renew your BLS certification online with us.

    What does BLS stand for CPR?

    Basic Life Support, or BLS, generally refers to the type of care that first-responders, healthcare providers and public safety professionals provide to anyone who is experiencing cardiac arrest, respiratory distress or an obstructed airway.

    What is BLS level CPR?

    BLS – Basic Life support This level is more in keeping with the skills required for teams of professional first responders, like paramedics and firefighters, or hospital and clinic healthcare workers, like nurses and doctors. This course is just a few hours long and is valid for 1 year.

    What does BLS CPR cover?

    In Summary. BLS covers essential life support skills that should be familiar to anyone. The course includes the skills required for successfully administering adult, child and infant CPR. The course also helps you identify risks and ensure the safety of people who need your help.

    What does a BLS certification include?

    BLS stands for Basic Life Support. BLS certification may refer to two things: Training that includes Healthcare Provider level skills such as 2-person CPR, pulse checks, bag valve mask use, and rescue breathing without compressions for people that have a pulse.

    What does BLS stand for?

    Basic Life Support, or BLS, generally refers to the type of care that first-responders, healthcare providers and public safety professionals provide to anyone who is experiencing cardiac arrest, respiratory distress or an obstructed airway.

    What is the difference between first aid and BLS?

    While CPR and First Aid are designed for non-medical personnel, and BLS for people in a medical setting, anyone can take BLS if they’d like to go through more advanced medical training.

    What is the difference between BLS and AED CPR?

    The difference between BLS and CPR is that the BLS class is an advanced CPR AED course. BLS is an abbreviation for Basic Life Support. The BLS CPR AED is a healthcare level CPR. If you are not a medical/healthcare professional the best course for you would be a standard CPR AED course with or without First aid.

    How long is BLS good for?

    BLS cards are valid for two years from the date on your certificate. If your American Red Cross BLS certification is about to expire (or has expired and you’re within 30 days of its expiration), you can enroll in an abbreviated BLS course (a review course) and get recertified for two more years.

    What is a BLS class like?

    Basic life support skills are anything but basic. The basic skills you’ll learn in a BLS provider course include single-rescuer CPR, team-based CPR, choking relief, and AED operation for adults, children, and infants—all things you would need to resuscitate unresponsive victims or provide immediate treatment.

    Does a BLS certification include first aid?

    Does BLS Certification Include First Aid? While some of the training does overlap with First Aid, like the initial scene size up and patient assessment, the BLS Certification Course does not generally cover First Aid training specifically.

    Is BLS first aid?

    Thus, while CPR and BLS skills both broadly fall into the category of first aid, BLS and first aid should not be considered synonymous. BLS certification classes will not cover things such as giving stitches, addressing minor injuries (or even broken bones), or many other topics.

    Is BLS higher than CPR?

    Basic life support (BLS) includes CPR but is an overall higher level of medical care typically administered by public safety professionals, first responders, paramedics, healthcare providers, and qualified bystanders.

    Can you fail a BLS class?

    Don’t worry, it’s not that difficult. It’s designed to get you to pass, not fail. You may not even be required to take a traditional test where you answer questions and mark your answer if you take a classroom only course. To pass the test you generally must score 80% or higher.

    What is a Basic Life Support (BLS) Certification (BLS vs CPR)?

    Unlike a standard CPR certification, a Basic Life Support (BLS) certification is a special type of CPR certification geared towards healthcare providers (Nurses, EMTs, Lifeguards, etc.). The emphasis of BLS is on high-performance CPR while working in teams. Additional equipment is used for providing ventilation (pocket masks and bag valve masks (BVM)). BLS certifications are valid for 2 years.

    What does basic life support certification cover?

    BLS Certification courses cover Adult, Child, and Infant skills as well as covering advanced techniques for fine-tuning care to the patients' needs by switching up the compression to ventilation ratios in different situations as well as other modifications. BLS courses also cover what to do for breathing emergencies like respiratory arrest and obstructed airway (choking). 

    Who Needs BLS Certification?

    BLS Certification is a job requirement for many professions that work in Healthcare and First Responder roles. Some of the jobs requiring BLS Certification include:

    • Doctors
    • Nurses
    • EMTs and Paramedics
    • Medical Assistants
    • Dentists
    • Pharmacists
    • Lifeguards
    • Firefighters
    • Police Officers.

    How do I get BLS Certification?

    A Basic Life Support (BLS) certification is earned by passing a BLS Certification course, generally from either the American Red Cross or American Heart Association. These courses include lectures, hands-on skills, as well as testing. The testing is both written and skill-based.

    What is the best way to complete a basic life support provider course?

    A BLS Certification Course can be completed in full in an Instructor-Led (classroom only) environment as well as with a hybrid Blended Learning delivery method where part of the course and testing is completed online and the skills portion of the class are completed in a classroom with an instructor using training aids (manikins, AED trainers, BVMs, etc.).

    How long is basic life support certification valid for?

    Once the course is successfully completed a participant is issued a BLS certification that is valid for 2 years.

    How long Does it take to get a BLS Certification?

    The American Red Cross instructor-led (classroom only) course takes about 4 hours to complete. It covers everything needed to know to get a BLS certification and also includes time for testing.

    How Much Does BLS Certification Cost?

    BLS certification costs vary depending on the delivery method (classroom only vs blended learning), the provider that is used, and the regional cost in your area. Most BLS providers also offer group discounts that can lower the costs substantially.

    Does BLS Certification Include First Aid?

    While some of the training does overlap with First Aid, like the initial scene size up and patient assessment, the BLS Certification Course does not generally cover First Aid training specifically. Seeing that BLS + First Aid is a common job requirement most training providers do provide course offerings with BLS + First Aid for an additional fee.

    How to Renew a BLS Certification?

    Most people renew their BLS Certification by taking the regular BLS Certification Course to get new certification. Recertification classes are sometimes available, although they are not as common. The BLS Renewal/Recertification Course is a shortened version of the Instructor-Led (classroom only) course. To renew a certification a participant must either hold a current BLS Certification or have one that expired within 30 days of the date of the BLS Renewal Course.

    Do basic life support courses include automated external defibrillator courses?

    Basic life support (BLS) and, when possible, the use of an automated external defibrillator (AED) is the first level of care for a person in cardiac arrest. During European Resuscitation Council (ERC) BLS/AED Provider courses, certified instructors will guide and support you in the learning process.

    Is AED part of BLS?

    The latest Adult Basic Life Support (BLS) guidelines support the inclusion of the use of the automated external defibrillator (AED), as part of basic life support (BLS).

    What are the 7 steps of CPR?

    The seven steps of CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) involve checking the scene and the person, calling 911 for assistance, opening the airway, checking for breathing, chest compressions, delivering rescue breaths, and repeating CPR steps.

    What does this course teach?

    • High-quality CPR for adults, children, and infants
    • The AHA Chain of Survival, specifically the BLS components
    • Important early use of an AED
    • Effective ventilations using a barrier device
    • Importance of teams in multi rescuer resuscitation and performance as an effective team member during multi rescuer CPR
    • Relief of foreign-body airway obstruction (choking) for adults and infants.

    Are you interested in learning more about Basic Life Support (BLS) Certification?

    Contact Key CPR today to speak with our knowledgeable staff about training questions and options. We would be happy to provide you with a free quote. Together we can make our community a safer place to Live, Play, and Work.

    Is it safe to defibrillate a victim if they are lying on a wet or metal surface?

    Yes, it is safe to defibrillate a victim who is lying on a metallic or wet surface. If the self-adhesive pads are applied correctly and provided there is no direct contact between the user and the victim when the shock is delivered, there is no direct pathway that electricity could take that would cause the user to experience shock.

    If the victim is wet, their chest should be dried so that the self-adhesive AED pads will stick properly. As with any attempt at defibrillation, particular care should be taken to ensure that no one is touching the victim when a shock is delivered.

    What is CPR?

    The letters CPR stand for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The term embraces all the procedures from basic first aid to the most advanced medical interventions that can be used to restore the breathing and circulation in someone whose heart and breathing have stopped.

    For lay people and first aiders, CPR refers to the basic first aid procedures that can be used to keep someone alive until the emergency medical services can get to the scene. The most important skills are chest compressions to pump blood around the body, and rescue breaths to provide oxygen. Rescue breaths are also known as ‘mouth to mouth’.

    What is a cardiac arrest?

    Cardiac arrest means that the heart has stopped pumping blood around the body. This may occur for many reasons, but loss of the electrical coordination that controls the normal heartbeat is usually responsible.

    The most likely cause is ventricular fibrillation, in which the normal orderly electrical signal that controls the heartbeat becomes completely disorganised and chaotic, and the heart is unable to act as a pump. Ventricular fibrillation can be treated with a defibrillator that delivers a high energy shock to restore the heart’s normal rhythm.

    Is a heart attack the same as a cardiac arrest?

    No, the terms mean different things. Although ‘heart attack’ is often used to refer to a sudden cardiac arrest, this is incorrect. A heart attack (or myocardial infarction, to use the medical term) occurs when an artery supplying the heart with blood becomes blocked. This usually causes chest pain and leads to damage to some of the muscle of the heart. It may cause cardiac arrest, particularly in the early stages, but this is not inevitable.

    The risk of cardiac arrest, however, emphasises the importance of calling for immediate help if anyone is suspected of having a heart attack, so that they can receive treatment to reduce the damage to their heart and reduce the risk of a cardiac arrest occurring.

    How effective is CPR?

    If bystanders who witness a cardiac arrest perform CPR, sufficient blood containing oxygen will reach the brain, heart and other organs to keep the person alive for several minutes. CPR by itself will not restart the heart, but it ‘buys time’ for the emergency medical services to reach the scene. Effective CPR more than doubles the chance of someone surviving a cardiac arrest.

    Is compression-only CPR effective?

    Compression-only CPR describes the performance of uninterrupted chest compressions without rescue breathing. In many adults who suffer a cardiac arrest, the heart stops abruptly; breathing will have been normal (or nearly normal), so the blood should be well oxygenated. In this situation compression-only CPR may be effective for the first few minutes after the heart stops. This may provide time for the emergency services to arrive or an AED to be collected. Ultimately the oxygen will be used up and rescue breaths are required to give the victim the best chance of resuscitation.

    Where cardiac arrest is caused by lack of oxygen (as in drowning and most arrests that occur in children) compression-only CPR will be much less effective.

    Chest compression alternating with rescue breaths is the ideal first aid procedure, but for untrained bystanders or those unwilling to give rescue breaths, compression-only CPR (hands only) is a useful alternative.

    How do I recognise that someone has had a cardiac arrest?

    When the heart stops, blood supply to the brain also stops. The victim will collapse unconscious and will be unresponsive. Breathing also stops, although it may take a few minutes to stop completely. For the first few minutes the victim may take noisy, infrequent or gasping breaths. The key features of cardiac arrest are therefore someone who is unconscious, unresponsive and NOT BREATHING NORMALLY. Noisy, infrequent or gasping breaths is not normal breathing.

    If you have any doubt whether someone is breathing normally or not, assume it is NOT normal: call 999 immediately and start CPR.

    What is the Chain of Survival?

    The Chain of Survival describes a sequence of steps that together maximise the chance of survival following cardiac arrest.

    1. The first link in the chain is the immediate recognition of cardiac arrest and calling for help. The second is the prompt initiation of CPR.
    2. The third is performing defibrillation as soon as possible.
    3. The fourth is optimal post-resuscitation care.
    4. Like any chain, it is only as strong as its weakest link. If one stage is weak, the chances of successful resuscitation are compromised.

    What happens after a cardiac arrest?

    When the heart is restarted after a cardiac arrest, recovery is not immediate. Admission to the hospital is always required for further treatment and investigation to establish the cause. Provided good CPR has been performed while the heart has stopped and defibrillation has been carried out promptly, the outlook is very good with most patients making an excellent recovery.

    How many people survive a cardiac arrest?

    In the UK fewer than 10% of all the people in whom a resuscitation attempt is made outside hospital survive. Improving this figure is a major priority for RCUK, the Department of Health and Social Care, ambulance services and first aid organisations.

    When all the stages in the Chain of Survival take place promptly, the figures are very much better. This is possible where the arrest is recognised immediately, bystanders perform CPR, and an automated defibrillator is used before the ambulance service arrive. Survival rates in excess of 50% have been reported under these circumstances.

    Could someone be sued for doing CPR?

    It is very unlikely that someone in the UK who acted in good faith when trying to help another person would be held legally liable for an adverse outcome. No such action has ever been brought against someone who performed CPR and, in general, the courts in the UK look favourably on those who go to the assistance of others.

    Resuscitation Council UK has published detailed guidance on the legal status of those who attempt resuscitation. This provides answers to most of the commonly asked questions on the subject.

    How can I be trained in CPR?

    Training in CPR is provided by many organisations, and some classes also include instruction in the use of an AED. Many different kinds of training are provided, ranging from ‘hands-on’ classes with training manikins to purely internet-based distance-learning instruction. It is recommended that training should include practice on a training manikin.

    Many ambulance services also teach the general public: contact your local service for further details.

    The voluntary first aid organisations (for example St John Ambulance, St. Andrew’s Ambulance, The British Red Cross and the Royal Life Saving Society) provide instruction; contact the branch nearest to you for details. There are also many private first aid training companies that provide training, and an internet search will identify those in your area.

    Is CPR done the same way in adults and children?

    The core principles of CPR - ventilation to provide breathing and chest compressions to support the circulation - apply equally to children and adults.

    Many children do not receive CPR because potential rescuers are not sure if there are specific methods recommended for children, and are afraid of causing harm. This fear is unfounded; it is far better to use the adult CPR sequence for resuscitation of a child than to do nothing. When performing chest compressions, compress the child's chest by 1/3 to 1/2 of its depth - don't be afraid to push hard.

    Although slightly different techniques are taught to those people (particularly healthcare workers) who have special responsibilities for the care of children, the differences are not crucial, and it is far more important to do something using the techniques you have been taught.

    How common is cardiac arrest in children?

    Fortunately, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in childhood is a rare event. Studies of OHCA in children and adolescents (excluding infants under one year old) report an incidence between 3 and 9 per 100,000 per year. The rates reported in infants are generally much higher (between 11 and 72 per 100,000 infants per year). The cause in this latter group is often attributed to the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

    The incidence of cardiac arrest from a primarily cardiac cause (which includes cases referred to as “sudden cardiac arrest” or SCA) has been reported to be 2 – 3 per 100,000 per year in children and adolescents. SCA is more common in boys than girls, and more likely to occur during or just after sporting activity.

    Warning symptoms for future SCA may include previous episodes of collapse or near-collapse, dizziness, palpitations, chest pain, shortness of breath or unexplained episodes of brief seizure-like activity. Such symptoms may not always be present, however, and can be difficult to interpret in the setting of sporting activity, where those participating may often be pushing themselves to the point of exhaustion. A family history of cardiovascular disease and unexplained death at a young age may also be highly relevant.

    Survival rates of 1.9 – 11.1% following attempted resuscitation have been reported, with good neurological outcome in many. Survival is more likely with witnessed events and a shockable rhythm on first ECG analysis - conditions often seen when an arrest occurs in a public location, like a school.

    How do I know if I should install an AED?

    Resuscitation Council UK and British Heart Foundation have written a Guide to Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) which gives full information about the use of AEDs in the community. We urge you to read this as it will answer your questions in more detail.

    What is an Automated External Defibrillator (AED)?

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) occurs because the normal electrical rhythm that controls the heart is replaced by a chaotic disorganised electrical rhythm called ventricular fibrillation (VF).

    An AED delivers a high energy electric shock to a victim in SCA caused by VF to restore the heart’s normal rhythm. AEDs are compact, portable, easy to use and guide the operator through the process with prompts and commands. The AED analyses precisely the victim’s heart rhythm and will only deliver a shock if it is required.

    Are AEDs safe to use?

    AEDs are very reliable and will not allow a shock to be given unless it is needed. They are extremely unlikely to do any harm to a person who has collapsed in suspected Sudden Cardiac Arrest. They are safe to use and present minimal risk to the rescuer. These features make them suitable for use by members of the public with little or no training).

    What is Public Access Defibrillation (PAD)?

    Public Access Defibrillation describes the use of AEDs by members of the public. AEDs can now be found in many busy public places including airports, mainline railway stations, shopping centres, and gyms. They are meant to be used by members of the public if they witness a cardiac arrest.

    How do I know where to find a Public Access Defibrillator?

    RCUK has designed a sign which many public spaces equipped with a PAD will display. There are many different signs that mark the location of the AED. When you call the ambulance service you will be directed to the nearest registered device. Staff working at the location should also know the location of an AED nearby.

    Do I need training to use an AED?

    AEDs have been used by untrained people to save lives. Clear, spoken instructions and visual illustrations guide users through the process. Lack of training should not be a barrier to someone using one. If a person is in cardiac arrest, do not be afraid to use an AED.

    Is it safe to use an AED if the victim is lying on a wet or metal surface?

    Yes, it is usually safe to use an AED on a victim who is lying on a metallic, wet or other conductive surface. If the self-adhesive pads are applied correctly, and provided there's no direct contact between the user and the victim when the shock is delivered, there is no direct pathway that electricity can take that would cause the user to experience a shock. If the victim is wet, his/her chest should be dried so that the self-adhesive AED pads will stick properly.

    Is it safe to use an AED on a child?

    Yes. The incidence of shockable rhythms requiring defibrillation in in children is very low but can occur. The priority must always be for high-quality CPR and getting expert help. However, the AED can be used across all age groups if this is the only available machine.

    The paediatric advanced life support Guidelines 2015 state that if using an AED on a child of less than eight years, a paediatric attenuated shock energy should be used if possible.

    Experience with the use of AEDs (preferably with dose attenuator) in children younger than one year is limited. The use of an AED is acceptable if no other option is available as, on balance, it is probably better to give a 50 J shock than nothing at all. The upper safe limit for dosage in this group is unknown.

    Is it safe to use an AED on a pregnant person?

    Yes. Fortunately cardiac arrest is rare in people who are pregnant, but if it were to occur it is quite appropriate to use an AED. The procedure is the same as in the non-pregnant but it is important to place the pads clear of enlarged breasts.

    Should all schools have an Automated External Defibrillator (AED)?

    Fortunately, sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in school-age children is rare. Resuscitation attempts at schools are more likely to be made on an adult (staff member or visitor) than a pupil. The presence of an AED at a school therefore provides potential benefit for everyone present at the site.

    An additional and important advantage of having an AED prominently located at a school is that students become familiar with them and can learn about first aid, resuscitation and the purpose of defibrillation.

    The Department of Education has issued guidance about the installation of AEDs in schools.

    If my place of work does not have an AED what should I do?

    If you think an AED should be installed in your workplace, read the Guide to AEDs written by RCUK and the BHF as this will answer your questions in detail. If you wish to proceed, contact your local ambulance service for further advice as described in the Guide.

    Why complete your basic life support training with The Mandatory Training Group?

    The Mandatory Training Group is the leading provider of accredited basic life support training courses, including:

    • Free basic life support (BLS) courses and training online
    • Adult basic life support training course and certification online
    • Paediatric basic life support training online and certification online
    • Newborn basic life support training online and certification online
    • Neonatal basic life support training online and certification online
    • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) courses and training online
    • Automated external defibrillator (AED) courses and training online.

    Contact our Coventry based Support Team on 024 7610 0090 or via Email to discuss how we can help your organisation with basic life support training courses for your organisation.

    Basic Life Support Courses & Training - Online Basic Life Support Courses and Training Providers - The Mandatory Training Group UK.

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