Online Safe Handling of Medicines Training Courses - CPDUK Accredited E-Learning Courses

Online Safe Handling of Medicines Training Courses - eLearning Courses - The Mandatory Training Group UK -

Safe Handling of Medicines Training Courses with Certificates - CPD Certified

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The Mandatory Training Group is the leading UK provider of accredited statutory and mandatory training courses for all sectors, including health and social care, education, local government, private and charity sectors. All our mandatory and statutory training programmes are externally peer-reviewed and accredited by the CPD Certification Service (CPDUK).

Medicines are given safely and correctly, and care staff preserve the dignity and privacy of the individuals when they provide medicines to them. Safe administration of medicines means that they give it in a way that avoids causing harm to a person.

Our online Safe Handling of Medicines training courses provide you with a comprehensive introduction to the safe handling of medicines. It also covers the relevant legislation, guidelines and the seven rights of medication administration. 

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Online Safe Handling of Medicines Training Courses: Frequently Ask Questions and Answers

Online Safe Handling of Medicines Training Courses - Safe Handling of Medicines Training E-Learning Courses with Certificates - CPDUK Accredited - The Mandatory Training Group UK.

Here at The Mandatory Training Group, we receive many enquiries about Online Safe Handling of Medicines training courses. We have listed some of these frequently asked questions and provide answers.

Click on the text below to see the answers to the Frequently Asked Questions about Online Safe Handling of Medicines Training.

Medicines are given safely and correctly, and care staff preserve the dignity and privacy of the individuals when they provide medicines to them. Safe administration of medicines means that they give it in a way that avoids causing harm to a person.

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If a tablet was dropped or spat out, they can dispose of it by flushing down the toilet. Staff must ensure that they administer medicines on an individual basis, and they must never prepare it in advance.

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OTC drugs are typically safe if used at recommended doses. Like illegal and prescription drugs, they can also abuse them. Although less potent than other substances, OTC drugs still pose a risk for developing an addiction.

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This online medication course provides all the knowledge requirements for the safe control, handling and administration of medicines in social and domiciliary care environments.

Care workers should only administer medicines when the document is apparent in the care plan. Care workers must be trained and competent to do so. The prescriber's directions must be clear, specific and unambiguous.

  • Oral administration
  • Sublingual
  • Rectal administration
  • Topical administration
  • Parenteral administration
  • Intravenous injection.
  • For example, level 1 = person self-medicates with general support. Level 2 = staff administer and level 3 = staff administered by specialist technique. However, levels are an out-dated way of thinking.

    The guidance states that care assistants should only administer medicines that they have been trained to give and that this will generally include assisting people in:

  • taking tablets, capsules, oral mixtures
  • applying a cream/ointment
  • inserting drops to ears, nose or eyes
  • administering inhaled medicines.
  • With medicines, however, it is imperative to follow the dosage prescribed by the health care provider. Taking too much medication or not enough can be dangerous. Some drugs may be helpful or harmful.

    Five Over-the-Counter medicines you should never take together:

  • Dangerous duo: Tylenol and multi-symptom cold medicines
  • Dangerous duo: Any combo of ibuprofen, naproxen, and aspirin
  • Dangerous duo: Antihistamines and motion-sickness medications
  • Dangerous duo: Anti-diarrheal medicine and calcium supplements.
  • Don't stop taking medication if you experience an unpleasant reaction. Talk to your doctor first. The benefits of the drug may far outweigh any side effects. Unpleasant or harmful reactions to medications are common. They can range from mild—little nausea, for example—to severe, such as fainting or palpitations.

    Medication monitoring or prompts: Low-tech devices, such as pillboxes with compartments to divide doses by days of the week, can help remind patients to take medications. Other useful prompts include signs, checklists, or even electronic devices to remind patients to take medication.

    If, for some reason, the person you care for is unwilling to take their medicines, talk to their GP or pharmacist. They may be able to suggest a form of medicine that's more acceptable than tablets.

    If the patient tells you it is the wrong medication or treatment, stop and check the order. Check physician orders for changes, and if you are unsure of a dosage, ask another nurse or the pharmacist to double-check your calculations.

    The risks of medicines are the chances that something unwanted or unexpected could happen to you when you use them. Risks could be less severe things, such as an upset stomach, or more serious things, such as liver damage.

    It could damage your kidneys if you take large amounts of over-the-counter medications, such as aspirin, naproxen and ibuprofen. It would be best if you took none of these daily or regularly without first talking to your healthcare provider.

    Some drugs replace missing substances or correct low levels of natural body chemicals such as some hormones or vitamins. Medicines can even affect parts of the nervous system that control a body process. Nearly everyone has taken an antibiotic. This type of medicine fights bacterial infections.

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    Any effect of a drug, chemical, or other medicine that is in addition to its intended effect, primarily a result that is harmful or unpleasant. Any accompanying or consequential and usually detrimental effect: the side effects of air pollution.

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    Medication training is essential for those working in the health and social care sector. Medication awareness training will cover the administration, prescribing, managing and handling of medicines safely such as morphine, sedatives, laxatives and antibiotics.

    Start with the basics:

  • Verify any medication order and make sure it's complete
  • Check the patient's medical record for an allergy or contraindication to the prescribed medication
  • Prepare medications for one patient at a time
  • Educate patients about their medications
  • Follow the eight rights of medication administration.
  • The Medicines Act 1968 Several pieces of legislation relating to medication and all care homes must comply with these. The Medicines Act 1968 provides the main legal framework for the prescribing, supply, storage and administration of medicines, classifying them into the following categories.

    Suppose the care home is registered to provide nursing care. In that case, it should be the medical practitioner or registered nurse who administers medicines.

    Aspirin. Hippocrates mentioned willow bark to treat pain, but it was not until 1899 when a pharmacist at Bayer isolated acetylsalicylic acid from willow to alleviate his father's rheumatism. Now, they use aspirin to relieve pain and fight inflammation caused by heart disease and numerous cancers.

    Sometimes, side effects are due to particular ingredients that not every brand uses. Changing the time of day you take your medicine may help, too, if your doctor gives you the OK. If someone is on four blood pressure medications, for example, I tell them not to take them all at once.

    Some common examples of mild adverse effects related to drugs include:

  • Constipation
  • Skin rash or dermatitis
  • Diarrhea
  • Dizziness
  • Drowsiness
  • Dry mouth
  • Headache
  • Insomnia.
  • Medication administration training delivered by experts. Medication administration is a critical service for social care providers. Medication errors made by health or social care professionals risk patient safety and unwanted scrutiny from regulators and safeguarding teams.

    Medication training is essential for those working in the health and social care sector. Medication awareness training will cover the administration, prescribing, managing and handling of medicines safely such as morphine, sedatives, laxatives and antibiotics.

    The guidance states that care assistants should only administer medicines that they have been trained to give and that this will generally. It includes assisting people in taking tablets, capsules, oral mixtures, applying a cream/ointment and inserting drops to ears, nose or eyes.

    The most common causes of medication errors are:

  • Poor communication between you and your doctors
  • Drug names that sound alike and medications that look alike
  • Medical abbreviations.
  • Consequences faced by physicians after medication errors can include loss of patient trust, civil actions, criminal charges, and medical board discipline.

    The eight most common root causes of medical errors:

  • Communication problems
  • Inadequate Information Flow
  • Human Problems
  • Patient-related Issues
  • Organizational Transfer of Knowledge
  • Staffing Patterns and Workflow
  • Technical Failures
  • Inadequate Policies.
  • The Mandatory Training Group is the leading UK provider of accredited statutory and mandatory training courses for all sectors, including health, safety and wellbeing, social care, education, local government, and many more.

    Click here for more Online Safe Handling of Medicines Training Courses

    On successful completion of each of the modules of Safe Handling of Medicines training courses, you may download, save, and print a quality assured continuing professional development (CPD) certificate. Our CPD certificates are recognised internationally and can be used to provide evidence for compliance and audit.

    The CPD Certification Service (CPDUK) accredits all of our statutory and mandatory training courses as conforming to universally accepted Continuous Professional Development (CPD) guidelines.

    Online Safe Handling of Medicines Training Courses - eLearning Courses - The Mandatory Training Group UK -

    Online Safe Handling of Medicines Training Courses - CPDUK Accredited E-Learning Courses - The Mandatory Training Group UK.

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