Online Handling Violence and Aggression Training Courses- CPDUK Accredited E-Learning Courses

Online Handling Violence and Aggression Training Courses - eLearning Courses - The Mandatory Training Group UK -

HANDLING VIOLENCE AND AGGRESSION TRAINING COURSES - CPD CERTIFIED

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The Mandatory Training Group is the leading UK provider of accredited statutory and mandatory training courses for all sectors, including health and social care, education, local government, private and charity sectors. All our mandatory and statutory training programmes are externally peer-reviewed and accredited by the CPD Certification Service (CPDUK).

Aggression and violence are terms often used interchangeably; however, the two are different. They can define violence as the use of physical force with the intent to injure another person or destroy property. In contrast, they generally define aggression as angry or violent feelings or behaviour. 

Our Online Handling Violence and Aggression Training Courses will help the learners understand the cause of violence and aggression in the workplace. And also, what to do if you have faced a threatening situation and will provide you with the knowledge and skills to deal with these situations.

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Online Handling Violence and Aggression Training Courses - Frequently Ask Questions and Answers

Online Handling Violence and Aggression Training Courses - Handling Violence and Aggression E-Learning Courses with Certificates - CPD Certified - The Mandatory Training Group UK.

Here at The Mandatory Training Group, we receive many enquiries about Online Handling Violence and Aggression Training Courses. We have listed some of these frequently asked questions and provide answers.

Click on the text below to see the answers to the Frequently Asked Questions about Handling Violence and Aggression.

Aggression and violence are terms often used interchangeably; however, the two differ. They can define violence as the use of physical force with the intent to injure another person or destroy property. In contrast, they can also describe aggression as angry or violent feelings or behaviour.

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Ways to control aggression and violence:

  • Preventing aggression
  • Set out clear expectations
  • Build rapport and be understanding
  • Show cultural sensitivity
  • Avoid negative talk
  • Don't assume or make judgments
  • Be encouraging
  • Avoid power struggles
  • Manage problems
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    Watching violent films does make people more aggressive, study shows. Watching violent movies does make people more aggressive. But only if they have an abrasive personality to start with, a study shows.

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    In some cases, your doctor may prescribe medications to treat your aggressive behaviour. For example, they may prescribe antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), such as phenytoin and carbamazepine. If you have schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, or bipolar disorder, they may prescribe mood stabilisers.

    The three aggression types comprised reactive-expressive (i.e., verbal and physical aggression), reactive-inexpressive (e.g., hostility), and proactive-relational aggression (i.e., aggression that can break human relationships, for instance, by circulating malicious rumours).

    Aggression can be verbal or physical. There are four different types of aggressive behaviour: accidental, expressive, instrumental and hostile.

    Many things can trigger anger, including stress, family problems, and financial issues. For some people, the cause of anger is by an underlying disorder, such as alcoholism or depression. They don't consider anger itself a disorder, but anger is a known symptom of several mental health conditions.

    Aggression is overt or covert, often harmful, social interaction to inflict damage or other unpleasantness upon another individual. It may occur either reactively or without provocation.

    Factors which increase the risk of violent behaviour:

  • Being the victim of physical abuse and/or sexual abuse
  • Exposure to violence in the home and/or community
  • Being the victim of bullying
  • Genetic (family heredity) factors.
  • How should I deal with my child's aggression:

  • Respond quickly
  • Never hit back
  • Show her how to do
  • Be consistent
  • Talk about your child's feelings
  • Reinforce responsibility
  • Limit screen time
  • Praise calm behaviour.
  • Exposure to violence on television, movies, and in video games increases the risk of violent behaviour on the viewer's part just as growing up in an environment filled with real violence increases the risk of violent behaviour.

    The influence of testosterone. Many vertebrate brain structures involved in the control of aggression are richly supplied with receptors that bind with hormones produced in the endocrine system, in particular with steroid hormones produced by the gonads.

    Although definitions of aggression vary, most researchers agree that aggressive acts are both intentional and potentially hurtful to the victim. Thus, learned aggression in humans is defined as learned (not instinctive) behaviour or actions that are meant to harm another individual.

    They characterise impulsive aggression (IA) by reactive, overt, explosive responses to situations that exceed normal and appropriate levels of emotion for the situation.

    There are four primary reasons or causes which are: Frustration—in which a goal is blocked by someone or having to deal with an individual deemed "unworthy" of one's time. Social learning—in which aggressive behaviour has been learned from observing others.

    Natural or positive aggression is also known as instrumental aggression, which is aimed mainly at self-defence or combating prejudice or social injustice.

    Aggressive communication is a style in which individuals express their feelings and opinions and advocate for their needs in a way that violates the rights of others. Thus, aggressive communicators are verbally or physically abusive. Aggressive communicators will often try to dominate others.

    Emotional aggression is the result of the extreme negative emotions we're experiencing at the time that we aggress and are not intended to create any positive outcomes.

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    Passive-aggressive behaviour is a pattern of indirectly expressing negative feelings instead of openly addressing them. For example, a passive-aggressive person might appear to agree — perhaps even enthusiastically — with another person's request.

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    They can relate feelings of anger or violent acting out to many different underlying difficulties, including depression, anxiety, addictions and other mental health problems. Many individuals can have underlying difficulties with severely low self-esteem, as well as problems with mistrust.

    It causes depression, anxiety and other mental health disorders. It also contributes to cancer, heart disease, stroke and HIV/AIDS because victims of violence often try to cope with their traumatic experiences by adopting risky behaviours such as using tobacco, alcohol and drugs, as well as engaging in unsafe sex.

    Set up a neighbourhood watch or a community patrol, working with police. Build a partnership with police, focus on solving problems instead of reacting to crises. Make it possible for neighbours to report suspicious activity or crimes without fear of retaliation.

    Although a more significant proportion of aggressive behaviour by females is verbal, they characterise males by more spoken as well as physical aggression. While some males do attack females, most male aggression is directed against other males.

    It measures seven specific types of aggression: assault, indirect aggression, irritability, negativism, resentment, suspicion and verbal aggression.

    Two brain areas involved in the neural network of aggressive behaviour are the amygdala and the hypothalamus.

    They commonly prescribe antidepressants such as Prozac, Celexa and Zoloft for anger issues. These drugs do not specifically target anger within the body. Still, they do have a calming effect that can support control of rage and negative emotion.

    Hostile aggression is a type of aggression that is committed in response to a perceived threat or insult. It is unplanned, reactionary, impulsive, and fueled by intense emotion as opposed to a desire to achieve a goal.

    Physical aggression includes hitting, kicking, scratching, pushing, biting, punching, grabbing, throwing objects, pinching, cutting, and stabbing. They consider verbal aggression as insulting, obscene or profane language or sexual advances.

    Other examples of passive aggressive behaviour might include avoiding direct or clear communication, evading problems, fear of intimacy or competition, making excuses, blaming others, obstructionism, playing the victim, feigning compliance with requests, sarcasm, backhanded compliments, and hiding anger.

    On successful completion of each of the modules of handling violence and aggression training courses, you may download, save, and print a quality assured continuing professional development (CPD) certificate. Our CPD certificates are recognised internationally and can be used to provide evidence for compliance and audit.

    The CPD Certification Service (CPDUK) accredits all of our statutory and mandatory training courses as conforming to universally accepted Continuous Professional Development (CPD) guidelines.

    The Mandatory Training Group is the leading UK provider of accredited statutory and mandatory training courses for all sectors, including health, safety and wellbeing, social care, education, local government, and many more.

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    Online Handling Violence and Aggression Training Courses - eLearning Courses - The Mandatory Training Group UK -

    Online Handling Violence and AggressionTraining Courses - CPDUK Accredited - E-Learning Courses - The Mandatory Training Group UK.

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