Online GDPR in Social Care Training Courses - CPDUK Accredited E-Learning Courses

Online GDPR in Social Care Training Courses - eLearning Courses - The Mandatory Training Group UK -

ONLINE GDPR in Social Care Training Courses - CPD CERTIFIED

Browse Online GDPR in Social Care Training!

The Mandatory Training Group is the leading UK provider of accredited statutory and mandatory training courses for all sectors, including health and social care, education, local government, private and charity sectors. We have supported over one million learners to reach their potential through e-learning courses and qualifications using our interactive online learning portal.

The General Data Protection Regulation is a European Union privacy law that comes into effect on May 25, 2018. It has been years in the making, and is to replace the last major piece of EU privacy law which dates from 1995: a time when Geocities was popular, before Facebook, before Myspace, before even Google.

These online GDPR in Health and Social Care training courses aim to highlight the critical aspects of the General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) and how they affect health and social care organisations. 

Online GDPR in Social Care Training Courses - CPD Certified E-Learning Courses with Certificates

LEARN

Learn anytime, anywhere on any device. Choose from over 500 CPDUK accredited e-learning courses and approved qualifications.

DEVELOP

Learn new skills in various subjects to improve your personal productivity, career development and employability opportunities.

COMPLY

Meet the UK and international legislative and regulatory requirements, industry standards and best practice recommendations.

Online GDPR in Social Care Training Courses: Frequently Ask Questions and Answers

Online GDPR in Social Care Training Courses - GDPR in Social Care Training E-Learning Courses with Certificates - CPDUK Accredited - The Mandatory Training Group UK.

Here at The Mandatory Training Group, we receive many enquiries from all sector providers about the GDPR in Social Care. We have listed some of these frequently asked questions and provide answers.

Click on the text below to see the answers to the Frequently Asked Questions about GDPR in Social Care

The GDPR gives the public more control of their personal data and simplifies and unifies organisations' regulations across the European Union. As social care professionals, you will need to collect and utilise specific data to carry out your duties.

The Mandatory Training Group is the leading UK provider of accredited statutory and mandatory training courses for all sectors, including health, safety and wellbeing, social care, education, local government, and many more.

Click here for more Online GDPR in Social Care Training Courses

Personal data means any information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person. An identifiable natural person can be identified, directly or indirectly, by reference to an identifier such as a name, identification number, location data, or online identifier.

The Mandatory Training Group is the leading UK provider of accredited statutory and mandatory training courses for all sectors, including health, safety and wellbeing, social care, education, local government, and many more.

Click here for more Online GDPR in Social Care Training Courses

There are restricted GDPR exemptions linked to personal data processing, as detailed here. When data are processed during an activity that falls outside of the remit of European Union legislation, GDPR does not apply to those who process data for personal or household activity.

The GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) respects individuals' rights when processing their personal information. This can be achieved by being open and honest with employees about using information about them and following good data handling procedures.

The GDPR applies to processes carried out by organisations operating within the EU. It also applies to organisations outside the EU that offer goods or services to individuals in the EU.

If you can collect the information from the public domain, i.e. a public register, GDPR does not apply.

The simple answer is that individuals' work email addresses are personal data. If you can identify an individual either directly or indirectly (even in a professional capacity), GDPR will apply. A person's individual work email typically includes their first/last name and where they work.

The Mandatory Training Group is the leading UK provider of accredited statutory and mandatory training courses for all sectors, including health, safety and wellbeing, social care, education, local government, and many more.

Click here for more Online GDPR in Social Care Training Courses

You can comply with GDPR are as follows:

  • Ensure that key people in your organisation (not just in the IT department) appreciate the importance of GDPR and compliance with it
  • Document the personal data you hold, where it came from, and who you share it with. To do this, you may need to organise an information audit
  • Review your current privacy notices and make any necessary changes Check your procedures to ensure that you can accommodate individuals' rights to be provided with their personal data in a commonly used format and that you can delete their data on request
  • Update your procedures so you can handle those requests within the required timescales (usually one month)
  • Identify the lawful basis for your processing activity in the GDPR, document it, and update your privacy notice to explain it
  • Review how you seek, record, and manage consent and whether you need to make any changes
  • Consider how to verify individuals' ages and how you can obtain parental or guardian consent for any data processing activity
  • Make sure you have procedures in place to detect, report and investigate a personal data breach
  • Understand when to carry out a Data Protection Impact Assessments (DPIA) – we'll discuss DPIAs in more detail shortly
  • Designate someone to take responsibility for data protection compliance and consider whether you must formally designate a Data Protection Officer
  • If you operate in more than one EU state, determine your lead data protection supervisory authority.
  • GDPR says about confidentiality because it is processed to ensure appropriate security of the personal data, including protection against unauthorised or unlawful processing and accidental loss.

    The GDPR has a chapter on the rights of data subjects (individuals) which includes:

  • The right of access
  • The right to rectification
  • The right to erasure
  • The right to restrict processing
  • The right to data portability
  • The right to object
  • The right not to be subject to a decision based solely on automated.
  • The Mandatory Training Group is the leading UK provider of accredited statutory and mandatory training courses for all sectors, including health, safety and wellbeing, social care, education, local government, and many more.

    Click here for more Online GDPR in Social Care Training Courses

    GDPR, which stands for General Data Protection Regulation, has been on a planned rollout in the European Union (EU) since May 2016. The regulation now gives individuals power over the use of their personal data. It holds organisations accountable for their data collection and usage practices.

    The GDPR defines a personal data breach as a breach of security leading to the accidental or unlawful destruction, loss, alteration, unauthorised disclosure of, or access to, personal data transmitted, stored or otherwise processed. This type of breach is most familiar with patients' records.

    GDPR requirements apply to all businesses, large and small, although some exceptions exist for SMEs.

    Law enforcement – the processing of personal data by competent authorities for law enforcement purposes is outside the GDPR's scope (e.g. the police investigating a crime).

    GDPR exemptions are:

  • Freedom of expression and information
  • Public access to official documents
  • National identification numbers
  • Employee data
  • Scientific and historical research purposes or statistical purposes
  • Archiving in the public interest
  • Obligations of secrecy
  • Churches and religious associations.
  • Yes, because employee data is subject to the same protections as client and customer data under the GDPR. When groups design their systems to be GDPR compliant, they must not forget to review and modify the systems that deal with internal staff information.

    The GDPR specifically applies to the processing of personal data or data subjects who are in the EU. There is no requirement that the employee resides or be an EU citizen, just like the employee in the EU.

    The GDPR applies to processes carried out by organisations operating within the EU. The GDPR does not apply to certain activities, including processing covered by the Law Enforcement Directive, processing for national security purposes, and processing carried out by individuals.

    No, the rules only apply to personal data about individuals. They don't govern data about companies or any other legal entities. However, information concerning one-person companies may constitute personal data where it allows identifying a natural person.

    Suppose someone has shared your email and is now marketing to you without your consent. In that case, it is a GDPR breach, and you can respond to them asking for an erasure request (request to get your data deleted).

    If you send an email containing personal data to the wrong recipient, it's a data breach. Always check you have the correct email address, don't assume outlook has found the right recipient.

    Individuals have the right to access their personal data. This is commonly referred to as subject access. Individuals can make a subject access request verbally or in writing. You have one month to respond to a request.

    The European Union's new privacy law email marketers to ensure that their programs are compliant.

    Yes, because GDPR was introduced in May 2018 to ensure personal data is not misused, disclosed, destroyed or lost.

    Any controller involved in processing shall be liable for the damage caused by processing that infringes this regulation. Liability will only cease to be relevant if the controller can prove that it wasn't responsible for the event, i.e. a data breach.

    GDPR does not cover personal data processing that concerns legal persons (such as limited companies), including the name and form of the legal person and the legal person's contact details. Therefore, there is no requirement in the regulation to redact the data about legal persons.

    Whereas the Data Protection Act only pertains to information used to identify an individual or their personal details, GDPR broadens that scope to include online identification markers, location data, genetic information and more.

    Suppose a breach is likely to result in a high risk to the rights and freedoms of individuals. In that case, the GDPR says you must inform those concerned directly and without undue delay. In other words, this should take place as soon as possible.

    Companies that fail to comply with the GDPR and misuse of personal data may see themselves splashed across the news pages. The resulting negativity could create significant reputational damage. The GDPR may also lead to claims against companies and individuals for negligence and/or wrongful acts.

    GDPR changes the regulatory environment and gives the ICO the power to impose eye-watering fines for those in breach. The Bill deals with elements of the regulatory framework not covered by GDPR and sets out the criminal offences for data protection breaches.

    It must comply with the GDPR, even if it does not have a business presence within the EU.

    Suppose you are processing personal information as a data controller. In that case, you need to pay the data protection fee to the ICO.

    There is a specific legal power under statutory power, but not an obligation, to share police information with another party.

    On successful completion of the Online GDPR in Social Care Training Courses will be able to download, save and/or print a quality assured continuing professional development (CPD) certificate. Our CPD certificates are recognised internationally and can be used to provide evidence for compliance and audit.

    The CPD Certification Service (CPDUK) accredits all of our statutory and mandatory training courses as conforming to universally accepted Continuous Professional Development (CPD) guidelines.

    The Mandatory Training Group is the leading UK provider of accredited statutory and mandatory training courses for all sectors, including health, safety and wellbeing, social care, education, local government, and many more.

    Click here for more Online GDPR in Social Care Training Courses

    Online GDPR in Social Care Training Courses - eLearning Courses - The Mandatory Training Group UK -

    Online GDPR in Social Care Training Courses - CPDUK Accredited E-Learning Courses - The Mandatory Training Group UK.

    Just added to your wishlist:
    My Wishlist
    You've just added this product to the cart:
    Go to Basket

    #title#

    #price#
    ×
    Sale

    Unavailable

    Sold Out