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The Mandatory Training Group is the leading UK provider of accredited statutory and mandatory training courses for healthcare and social care organisations. All our mandatory and statutory training programmes are externally peer-reviewed and accredited by the CPD Certification Service (CPDUK).

Anaphylaxis is a severe, life-threatening allergic reaction that is rapid in onset and may cause death if untreated. The most common anaphylactic reactions are to foods, insect stings, medications and latex. 

Our online Anaphylaxis for Healthcare Professionals Training Courses will provide the learners with a clear understanding of the legislation and guidelines regarding the management of anaphylaxis. And also it improves awareness and response to adults and children who suffer from severe allergic reactions.

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Anaphylaxis for Healthcare Professionals Training Courses: Frequently Ask Questions and Answers

Online Anaphylaxis for Healthcare Professionals Training Courses - E-Learning Courses with Certificates - CPD Certified - The Mandatory Training Group UK.

Here at The Mandatory Training Group, we receive many enquiries about form all sector providers about Anaphylaxis for Healthcare Professionals training. We have listed some of these frequently asked questions.

Click on the text below to see the answers to the Frequently Asked Questions about on Anaphylaxis for Anaphylaxis for Healthcare.

Anaphylaxis is a severe, potentially life-threatening allergic reaction. It can occur within seconds or minutes of exposure to something you're allergic to, such as peanuts or bee stings.

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Food was the most common specified trigger of anaphylaxis. Reactions to peanut made up approximately 45% of food induced anaphylaxis cases, while tree nuts and seeds constituted about 19% and milk caused about 10% of the cases. Other common triggers included drugs, blood products and venom.

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Allergic reactions are common in children, and most reactions are mild. A severe allergic reaction involves a person's breathing and circulation.

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Call 999 or emergency medical help

  • Use an epinephrine auto-injector, if available, by pressing it into the person's thigh
  • Make sure the person is lying down and elevate his or her legs
  • Check the person's pulse and breathing and, if necessary, administer CPR or other first-aid measures.
  • Uniphasic reaction. Symptoms peak within 30 minutes to an hour after you're exposed to the allergen. Symptoms get better within an hour, with or without treatment, and they don't return.

    Signs and symptoms include:

  • Skin reactions, including hives and itching and flushed or pale skin
  • Low blood pressure (hypotension)
  • Constriction of your airways and a swollen tongue or throat, which can cause wheezing and trouble breathing
  • Nausea, vomiting or diarrhoea
  • Dizziness or fainting.
  • Common anaphylaxis triggers include:

  • Skin reactions, including hives and itching and flushed or pale skin
  • Foods – including nuts, milk, fish, shellfish, eggs and some fruits.
  • Medicines – including some antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like aspirin
  • Insect stings – particularly wasp and bee stings.
  • General anaesthetic.
  • Anaphylaxis can occur within minutes. The average is around 20 minutes after exposure to the allergen. Symptoms may be mild at first but tend to get worse rapidly.

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  • Type I: Immediate Hypersensitivity (Anaphylactic Reaction) These allergic reactions are systemic or localised,
  • Type II: Cytotoxic Reaction (Antibody-dependent)
  • Type III: Immune Complex Reaction
  • Type IV: Cell-Mediated (Delayed Hypersensitivity)
  • H1 antihistamines — Epinephrine is the first-line treatment for anaphylaxis, and there is no known equivalent substitute. H1 antihistamines (such as diphenhydramine or cetirizine) relieve itch and hives.

    If you're with someone having an allergic reaction with signs of anaphylaxis, immediately call 999 or your local medical emergency number. Ask the person if he or she is carrying an epinephrine auto-injector (EpiPen, Auvi-Q, others) to treat an allergic attack.

    The first step for treating anaphylactic shock will likely be injecting epinephrine (adrenaline) immediately. It can reduce the severity of the allergic reaction. At the hospital, you'll receive more epinephrine intravenously (through an IV). You may also receive glucocorticoid and antihistamines intravenously.

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    It can be mild, moderate to severe, or severe. Most cases are mild, but any anaphylaxis has the potential to become life-threatening. Anaphylaxis develops rapidly, usually reaching peak severity within 5 to 30 minutes, and may, rarely, last for several days.

    Myth: Each allergic reaction will get worse and worse. Fact: Food allergy reactions are unpredictable. The way your body reacts to a food allergen one time cannot predict how it will react the next time.

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    In sporadic cases, reactions develop after 24 hours. Anaphylaxis is a sudden and severe allergic reaction that occurs within minutes of exposure. Immediate medical attention is needed for this condition. Without treatment, anaphylaxis can get worse very quickly and lead to death within 15 minutes.

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    Runny or stuffy nose and sneezing. Shortness of breath or trouble breathing and rapid heartbeat. Swollen or itchy lips or tongue. Swollen or scratchy throat, hoarse voice, trouble swallowing, tightness in your throat.

    Common triggers of severe allergies or anaphylaxis include:

  • Food, Milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, sesame, fish, shellfish, wheat and soy are the most common food triggers, which cause 90 percent of allergic reactions; however, any food can trigger anaphylaxis.
  • Bites and Stings
  • Medication.
  • Epinephrine is the only medication that can reverse severe anaphylactic symptoms. It is available by prescription. Monitor for late-phase anaphylaxis which can occur in up to 20% of acute anaphylaxis and can be more challenging to treat.

    Symptoms of anaphylaxis can be mild, and they may go away on their own (most anaphylactic reactions will require treatment). But it's difficult to predict if or how quickly they will get worse. Symptoms can be late for several hours.

    However, in chronic asthma or adult onset asthma, runny nose or "hay fever" type symptoms are common. On the other hand, a clear sign of an anaphylactic episode is swelling of the face, hives on the skin, vomiting or other digestive systems. These acute symptoms are very uncommon with asthma alone.

    An emergency anaphylaxis kit is what you or people around you can use if you have a severe allergic reaction. You might need medical help right away. The kit contains the epinephrine medicine that you inject into your arm or leg (or have a friend inject).

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    For severe allergic reactions which lead to hypotension, epinephrine helps to increase blood flow through veins by constricting blood vessels. By binding to receptors on smooth muscles of the lungs, epinephrine helps to relax the muscles blocking the airways and allows breathing to return to normal.

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    If you have an anaphylactic reaction, but don't have epinephrine, you have a difficult problem. If you have it, you can try to take antihistamines.

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    The signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis may include sudden onset:

  • Hives,
  • Itching,
  • Redness of the skin,
  • Swollen eyes, lips, tongue or face,
  • Difficulty breathing, throat constriction (tightening) or difficulty, and
  • Swallowing.
  • Allergies and asthma tend to run in families, and it is believed to be a genetic predisposition to them. You could develop anaphylaxis in future exposures to the allergen even if your usual reaction is mild, such as a rash.

    Use your epinephrine auto-injector first (it treats both anaphylaxis and asthma). Then use your asthma relief inhaler (e.g. albuterol). Call 999 and go to the hospital by ambulance.

    Asthma, food allergy and high risk of anaphylaxis (severe allergic reaction) frequently occur together, and asthma increases the risk of fatal anaphylaxis. It is, therefore, essential to managing your asthma well, as part of anaphylaxis risk management.

    Chlorphenamine and cetirizine are fast-acting antihistamines and take 15-20 minutes to work. Some others take much longer. For anyone at risk of a severe allergic reaction (known as anaphylaxis), an adrenaline auto-injector (AAI) will be prescribed as well as antihistamines.

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    H2RAs, such as ranitidine and cimetidine, block the effects of released histamine at H2 receptors, therefore treating vasodilatation and possibly some cardiac effects, as well as glandular hypersecretion.

    Adrenaline usage may provide rapid relief of severe hypersensitivity reaction to drugs and other allergens, and in the emergency treatment of anaphylactic shock. IM Injection: Adults: The usual dose is 500 micrograms (0.5ml of adrenaline 1/1000).

    Epinephrine works by reversing the symptoms of anaphylaxis. For example, a person's blood pressure plummets during an anaphylactic reaction because the blood vessels relax and dilate — epinephrine causes the blood vessels to constrict, which raises blood pressure.c

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    Dilute one ampoule (1 mL) of adrenaline 1:1000 with 9 mL water for injection or normal saline. Inject intramuscularly up to a maximum of 500 micrograms (5 mL) according to the guide (approximates to 10 microgram/kg).

    This online Anaphylaxis Training for Nurses course should be completed by those who work in health and social care services, including NHS medical, nursing, AHP and care staff,Locum doctors and nurses,Locum allied health professionals (AHPs),Agency nurses,Agency workers,Healthcare Assistants,Support workers,Care assistants, and Community services.

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    On successful completion of each of theAnaphylaxis for Healthcare Professionals Training Courses modules, you may download, save, and print a quality assured continuing professional development (CPD) certificate. Our CPD certificates are recognised internationally and can be used to provide evidence for compliance and audit.

    The CPD Certification Service (CPDUK) accredits all of our statutory and mandatory training courses as conforming to universally accepted Continuous Professional Development (CPD) guidelines.

    The Mandatory Training Group is the leading UK provider of accredited statutory and mandatory training courses for all sectors, including health, safety and wellbeing, social care, education, local government, and many more.

    Online Anaphylaxis for Healthcare Professionals Training Courses

    Online Anaphylaxis for Healthcare Professionals Training Courses - eLearning Course - The Mandatory Training Group UK -

    Online Anaphylaxis for Healthcare Professionals Training Courses - CPDUK  Accredited - Mandatory Training Group UK.

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