FREE Fire Safety Awareness Training - E-learning Course

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Fire incidents in the home or work setting can be devastating. Often, fires result in significant damage to property, injuries or even deaths. Fire safety awareness and knowledge are essential for maintaining a safe environment, both at home and in work settings. Also, fire safety awareness can help to prevent distressing consequences and financial losses.

Since the publication of the Fire Safety Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005, the provision of fire safety training has become a legal requirement for all employees within the UK. Fire safety is particularly challenging since many people may require some degree of assistance to ensure their safety in the event of a fire.

Fire safety is the set of practices intended to reduce the destruction caused by fire. Fire safety measures include those that are designed to prevent ignition of an uncontrolled fire, and those that are used to limit the development and effects of a fire after it starts.    

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Here at The Mandatory Training Group, we receive many enquiries from employers across all sectors about fire safety training courses. Below, we have listed some of the most frequently asked questions about fire safety awareness and provided answers.

Click on the questions below to see the answers to the commonly asked questions about fire safety.

Fire is the rapid oxidation of a material in the exothermic chemical process of combustion, releasing heat, light, and various reaction products. This definition does not include slower oxidative processes like rusting or digestion.

Fire development can be described as being comprised of four stages:

  • Incipient
  • Growth
  • Fully developed
  • Decay
  • Flashover is not a stage of development, but merely a rapid transition between the growth and sufficiently advanced stages.

    Flames are the result of a chemical reaction, primarily between oxygen in the air and a fuel, such as wood or propane. In addition to other products, the reaction produces carbon dioxide, steam, light, and heat. If the flame is hot enough, the gases are ionized and become yet another state of matter: plasma.

    Fire is the result of a chemical reaction called combustion. At a certain point in the combustion reaction, called the ignition point, flames are produced. Flames consist primarily of carbon dioxide, water vapour, oxygen, and nitrogen.

    Fire is a chemical reaction that gives off light and heat. It is an example of the chemical process of oxidation.

    Ultra-high pressure is defined by the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) as pump pressures above 1100 psi. By flowing water at these pressures, 10x the surface area is created by breaking down conventional water droplets into 64 smaller droplets allowing for at least a fifth of the water usage.

    The fire triangle illustrates the three elements a fire needs to ignite:

  • Fuel
  • Oxygen
  • Chemical chain reaction.
  • A fire naturally occurs when the elements are present and combined in the right mixture, meaning that fire is an event rather than a thing.

    The Fire Triangle or Combustion Triangle is a simple model for understanding the necessary ingredients for most fires. The triangle illustrates the three elements a fire needs to ignite: heat, fuel, and an oxidizing agent.

    Fire is the rapid oxidation of a material in the exothermic chemical process of combustion, releasing heat, light, and various reaction products. The flame is the visible portion of the fire. Flames consist primarily of carbon dioxide, water vapour, oxygen and nitrogen.

    The equation represents the combustion of fire: CH4 + 2O2 → CO2 + 2H2O.

    The triangle illustrates the three elements a fire needs to ignite: heat, fuel, and an oxidizing agent (usually oxygen). A fire naturally occurs when the elements are present and combined in the right mixture, meaning that fire is an event rather than a thing.

    The classification of fire:

  • Class A - fires involving solid materials such as wood, paper or textiles.
  • Class B - fires involving flammable liquids such as petrol, diesel or oils.
  • Class C - fires involving gases.
  • Class D - fires involving metals.
  • Class E - fires involving live electrical apparatus.
  • Cooking equipment is the leading cause of home structure fires and home fire injuries. Smoking is the leading cause of civilian home fire deaths. Heating equipment is the second most common cause of home fire fatalities. Candles The top three days for home candle fires are New Year's Day, Christmas, and New Year's Eve.

    Fire is the rapid oxidation of a material in the exothermic chemical process of combustion, releasing heat, light, and various reaction products. The flame is the visible portion of the fire. Flames consist primarily of carbon dioxide, water vapour, oxygen and nitrogen.

    The most common type of fire in the world is the kitchen fire. The reason that the kitchen is the source of many fire hazards is that the kitchen is where heat, electricity, water, and grease come together.

    These are the ratio of appliances that caused fire:

  • 14% of washing machines
  • 12% tumble dryers
  • 11% dishwashers
  • 9% cookers
  • 7% fridges / freezers
  • 5% central heating
  • 4% toasters / grills
  • 4% microwaves
  • 3% of TVs
  • 2% washer dryers
  • 1% irons
  • These are the 4 types of fire extinguishers:

  • Class A extinguishers will put out fires in ordinary combustibles such as wood and paper.
  • Class B extinguishers are for use on flammable liquids like grease, gasoline and oil.
  • Class C extinguishers are suitable for use only on electrically energized fires
  • Class D extinguishers are designed for use on flammable metals
  • Fires can spread very quickly, but an additional 10 degrees of the slope is enough to double the speed at which a fire spreads. At some points in the slope is three times that value. Fires can travel quickly: up to 6 miles-per-hour in forests and up to 14 miles-per-hour in grasslands.

    To escape from a house fire, try to stay calm and make your way to the nearest exit, staying as low to the ground as possible to avoid smoke inhalation and increase visibility. Next, use the back of your hand to feel doorknobs before you open them and shut the door quickly if you encounter fire or smoke.

    Any electrical appliance that's left plugged into the mains could cause a fire. Some, like fridges and freezers, are designed to be left on, but even these can cause fires if they' are correctly used. Keep the area around plug sockets, and the mains switch clear.

    Candles turn to liquid to release their fragrance, and this wax carries heat, and that can cause another surface, such as a wood table, to catch fire. Over half of all candle fires start because the candle was too close to combustible materials.

    50% of all reported fires cases started in the kitchen. Most house fires occur between 5:00 and 8:00 p.m -- which are the usual times when one is cooking dinner.

    ABC Fire Extinguishers. They use monoammonium phosphate, which is a dry chemical that can quickly put out the fire. It is a pale yellow powder that can put out all three classes of fire:

  • Class A for trash, wood and paper
  • Class B for liquids and gases and
  • Class C for energized electrical sources.
  • Class A fires define us an ordinary combustible. These types are fires use commonly flammable material as their fuel source. Wood, fabric, paper, trash, and plastics are common sources of Class A fires. Mainly the common accidental fire encountered across several different industries.

    It releases a blanket of CO2 gas that keeps air from the fire. A dry-powder extinguisher (2) contains sodium bicarbonate, which smothers a fire. A soda-acid extinguisher (3) contains sodium carbonate and a flask of acid. If the container broke chemical reaction releases a stream of bubbly water.

    A fire can spread in three different ways if there's enough fuel and oxygen to keep it going. It will spread through conduction, convection or radiation, but a combination of all three often spreads fires. Conduction is when heat moves through materials and objects.

    Top tips of fire safety:

  • Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, inside bedrooms and outside sleeping areas.
  • Test and check smoke alarms every month.
  • Talk with all family members about a fire escape plan and practice the plan twice a year.
  • If a fire occurs in your home, GET OUT, STAY OUT and CALL FOR HELP.
  • If you hear a smoke alarm or discover a fire, these are the things must do:

  • Try not to panic.
  • Tell everyone in the house.
  • Use your pre-planned escape route to get everyone out of the building as quickly as possible.
  • Smoke rises, so stay low or crawl on the floor in the cleaner air where it's easier to breathe.
  • Do not stop to collect any valuables or possessions.
  • Do not stop to look for pets.
  • If possible, close the door to the room where the fire is located and close all doors behind you as you leave (to delay the spread of fire and smoke).
  • Before opening a closed door, touch it with the back of your hand; do not open it if it feels warm - the fire will be on the other side.
  • These are the simple tips to both help prevent house fires occurring and keep your family safe if they do:

  • Fit a smoke alarm.
  • Store matches and electrical items safely on moving day.
  • Check electrical appliances.
  • Choose an escape route.
  • Know the building procedures.
  • Check the chimney.
  • Fit carbon monoxide detectors.
  • These are some tips on how to escape a fire safely:

  • Identify your exits.
  • Get out fast.
  • Check doors for heat before opening.
  • Stay low to the ground to avoid breathing smoke.
  • If anything on your person catches on fire, STOP, DROP and ROLL.
  • Do not use elevators during a fire.
  • If you can not get out, secure your room and yourself.
  • Set up a safe and easy-to-remember place to meet others once you have escaped.
  • Pick a place outside your home or office (that's far enough away from the building) to meet up with everyone else.
  • After you get out, call the fire department.
  • Do not go back inside!
  • Practice your escape plan regularly.
  • Fire control is the practice of reducing the heat output of a fire, reducing the area over which the fire exists, or suppressing or extinguishing the fire by depriving it of fuel, oxygen, or heat.

    4 ways to extinguish a fire:

  • Fire Extinguishers - (Water & Foam, CO2, Dry Chemical Powder, Wet Chemical, Clean agent)
  • Fire suppression systems (FM200, Halon)
  • Sprinklers
  • Fire Hydrants.
  • The process of fire extinguishing involves absorption of heat. Absorption of heat in converting hot water to steam is more than the heat absorbed in heating cold water to the boiling temperature. Hence boiling water can extinguish the fire more quickly than ice or cold water.

    These are the ways on how to stop an oil fire starts, you must:

  • Cover the flames with a metal lid or cookie sheet.
  • Turn off the heat source.
  • If it's small and manageable, pour baking soda or salt on it to smother the fire.
  • As a last resort, spray the fire with a Class B dry chemical fire extinguisher.
  • Do not try to extinguish the fire with water.
  • Do not attempt to move the pot or pan outside.
  • Hot water readily converts to steam, absorbing an enormous amount of heat and therefore hot water is better for fire extinguishing purpose than cold water.

    Water and Foam fire extinguishers extinguish the fire by taking away the heating element of the fire triangle.

    Water also can start a fire. The presence of moisture can rapidly increase the current in the circuit, which in most modern appliances will cause a short circuit as the fuse blown. However, if a fuse is not present, then the wire will heat up, and a fire could start.

    In a building, a fire hydrant system is a safety measure or emergency equipment required in some buildings. It comprises a series of components that when assembled, provide a source of water to assist fire authorities in a fire.

    They then open a valve that allows water to flow through the hydrant into the hoses. Fire hydrants can typically supply a large volume of water. This water pump through tubes to the fire truck, where it is pressurized and divided into several streams to provide water to multiple fire hoses at once.

    There are three types of dry barrel hydrants: slide-gate, toggle, and compression. In a compression hydrant, a vertical stem works like a piston. It moves toward or away from a seat to close and open the main valve.

    Red, yellow, violet- fire hydrants colours are meant for different types of fires. Each colour represents GPM (Gallons Per Minute). Higher GPMs are meant for more massive fires. Yellow indicates a water supply from the public supply system. Violet indicates water comes from a lake or pond water.

    The ways how to prevent fire:

  • Avoid unattended or careless use of candles. No open flames are allowed inside any Tufts University building.
  • Keep BBQ grills at least 10 feet from the house.
  • Do not disable smoke or CO detectors.
  • Do not smoke indoors.
  • Do not leave your cooking unattended.
  • These are some Fire safety tips on how to prevent fire accident:

  • Keep all fires and heaters well guarded, especially open fires.
  • Keep portable heaters and candles away from furniture and curtains.
  • Don't dry or air clothes over or near the fire, or the cooker.
  • Do not smoke in bed.
  • Many fires start in the kitchen, especially fat fires.
  • If there are children around, keep matches and lighters well out of reach.
  • Fit approved smoke detectors on each floor.
  • Plan your escape route. Remember to get out, stay out and call the fire brigade out!
  • These are the ways how to prevent electrical fire:

  • Have your wiring installation checked at least once every five years by an approved contractor, or straight away if you are buying an older property.
  • Do not use appliances with worn or damaged flexes. Don't wire flexes together.
  • Keep portable mains-operated appliances out of the bathroom.
  • Have electric blankets serviced and checked regularly.
  • If an appliance appears faulty stop using it and have it checked at once.
  • Consider having an RCD (residual current device) for whole-house protection. These are especially valuable when power tools are used.
  • Look for the CE mark when you buy electrical equipment.
  • Never overload an electric socket.
  • There is a type of flame called “cool” fire, but that is considered to be below 400° C or 752° F. This type of fire is chemically induced and emits very little heat. But it is still hot enough to burn you.

    Luckily, Class A fires are the easiest type to extinguish. The Fire Equipment Manufacturer's Association recommended using a water or foam fire extinguisher on Class A fires. You can also use water to douse the fire, as it can remove the fire's heat supply.

    A fire needs three elements - heat, oxygen and fuel. Without heat, oxygen and fuel, a fire will not start or spread. A key strategy to prevent fire is to remove one or more of heat, oxygen or fuel. The risk assessment should include detail on all three elements to minimise the risk of a fire starting/ spreading.

    Most electrical fires are caused by faulty electrical outlets and old, outdated appliances. Faults start other fires in appliance cords, receptacles and switches. Removing the grounding plug from a cable so it can be used in a two-prong electrical outlet can also cause a fire.

    Cooking equipment is the leading cause of home structure fires and home fire injuries. Smoking is the leading cause of civilian home fire deaths. Heating equipment is the second most common cause of home fire fatalities. Candles The top three days for home candle fires are New Year's Day, Christmas, and New Year's Eve.

    Most electrical fires are caused by faulty electrical outlets and old, outdated appliances. Running cords under rugs is another cause of electrical fires. Removing the grounding plug from a cable so it can be used in a two-prong electrical outlet can also cause a fire.

    To escape from a house fire, try to stay calm and make your way to the nearest exit, staying as low to the ground as possible to avoid smoke inhalation and increase visibility. Next, use the back of your hand to feel doorknobs before you open them and shut the door quickly if you encounter fire or smoke.

    There is a big difference between fire protection and fire prevention. Fire protection uses tools and processes to maintain safety and reduce hazards associated with fires. Fire prevention involves the steps that can prevent a fire from occurring.

    In addition to possible injury and loss of life, a severe fire can close down a workplace resulting in significant job losses. It is possible to reduce the threat of fire to people and property by teaching everyone to work together to prevent fires with comprehensive fire safety training.

    The mandatory Training Group is the leading UK provider of accredited fire safety training courses, including fire safety awareness, fire warden and fire marshal training courses. Click here to see our wide range of online fire safety training courses. Click here for Fire Safety Training Courses.

    The Mandatory Training Group UK -

    FREE Fire Safety Awareness Training Course - Online Fire Safety Training Course - CPDUK Accredited.

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