FREE Coping with Workplace Stress - E-Learning Course 

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Technological advancements over the past few decades have entirely changed life as we knew it. Often, many people talk about how stressed they are, and numbers of people suffering from stress-related mental health and physical health conditions continue to increase.

A lot of people do feel stressed at times, and some people even find stress helpful or motivational. However, stress usually affect lives more negatively, sometimes also leading to ruin. It is essential to recognise that stress has many different symptoms, some of which are not easy to identify. For some people, stress might affect their physical or mental health, and some times, both.

While some workplace stress is normal, excessive stress can interfere with your productivity and performance. Work-related stress can impact your physical and emotional health and affect your relationships and home life. It can even mean the difference between success and failure in the job. You can't always control everything in your work environment, but that doesn't mean that you're powerless, even when you're stuck in a difficult situation. 

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FREE Coping with Workplace Stress E-Learning Course.

Here at The Mandatory Training Group, we receive many enquiries from health, safety and Wellbeing providers about the Stress. We have listed some of these frequently asked questions.

Click on the text below to see the answers to the FAQs about Coping with Stress.

Stress is the body's reaction to any change that requires an adjustment or response. The body reacts to these changes with physical, mental, and emotional responses. Stress is a normal part of life. You can experience stress from your environment, your body, and your thoughts.

Stress is a word used in biology and medicine to describe changes that can be seen in organisms. Stress can be physical or mental. Stress can describe a pressure, like the pressure of a person's upper teeth on their lower teeth while chewing.

Stress is a feeling of emotional or physical tension. It can come from any event or thought that makes you feel frustrated, angry, or nervous. Stress is your body's reaction to a challenge or demand. In short bursts, stress can be positive, such as when it helps you avoid danger or meet a deadline.

Stress can affect people of health issues. By definition, stress is any uncomfortable "emotional experience accompanied by predictable biochemical, physiological and behavioural changes.

Workplace stress is the harmful physical and emotional responses that can happen when there is a conflict between job demands on the employee and the amount of control an employee has over meeting these demands.

Chronic stress is the response to emotional pressure suffered for a prolonged period of time in which an individual perceives they have little or no control. It involves an endocrine system response in which corticosteroids are released.

Acute stress is one of the least damaging types of stress, which is good because it is also the most common type. We experience acute stress multiple times throughout the day. Acute stress is experienced as an immediate perceived threat, either physical, emotional or psychological.

The feeling of being stressed can be triggered by an event that makes you feel frustrated or nervous. Anxiety is a feeling of fear, worry, or unease. It can be a reaction to stress, or it can occur in people who are unable to identify significant stressors in their life. Stress and anxiety are not always bad.

Stress can be caused by any type of physical or emotional stimulus or situation. Often, people speak of different types of stress such as work stress, relationship stress, or parenting stress.

Stress can cause or exacerbate many serious health problems, including mental health problems, such as depression, anxiety, and personality disorders. Cardiovascular disease, including heart disease, high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, heart attacks, and stroke.

Stress can play a part in problems such as headaches, high blood pressure, heart problems, diabetes, skin conditions, asthma, arthritis, +, and anxiety. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) declared stress a hazard of the workplace.

Physical symptoms of stress include the ff:

  • Low energy.
  • Headaches.
  • Upset stomach, including diarrhoea, constipation, and nausea.
  • Aches, pains, and tense muscles.
  • Chest pain and rapid heartbeat.
  • Insomnia.
  • Frequent colds and infections.
  • Loss of sexual desire and/or ability.
  • Some of the psychological and emotional signs that you're stressed out include:

  • Depression or anxiety.
  • Anger, irritability, or restlessness.
  • Feeling overwhelmed, unmotivated, or unfocused.
  • Trouble sleeping or sleeping too much.
  • Racing thoughts or constant worry.
  • Problems with your memory or concentration.
  • Making bad decisions.
  • These are some symptoms of workplace stress:

  • Fatigue.
  • Muscular tension.
  • Headaches.
  • Heart palpitations.
  • Sleeping difficulties, such as insomnia.
  • Gastrointestinal upsets, such as diarrhoea or constipation.
  • Dermatological disorders.
  • These are the steps how to deal with office stress:

  • Track your stressors. Keep a journal for a week or two to identify which situations create the most stress and how you respond to them
  • Develop healthy responses
  • Establish boundaries
  • Take time to recharge
  • Learn how to relax
  • Talk to your supervisor
  • Get some support.
  • In moderation, anxiety is not necessarily a bad thing. Anxiety disorders are among the most common mental health issues and are highly treatable. Once you understand your anxiety disorder, there are steps you can take to reduce the symptoms and regain control of your life.

    The physical effects of prolonged stress are numerous, including greater susceptibility to illness, a lack of energy, problems with sleep, headaches, poor judgment, weight gain, depression, anxiety, and a host of other ills.

    This are the main causes of stress:

  • Money
  • Work
  • Poor health
  • The death of a loved one.
  • Divorce
  • Loss of a job.
  • Increase in financial obligations.
  • Getting married.
  • Moving to a new home.
  • Emotional problem.
  • Chronic illness or injury.
  • This are the stress signals you can tell that stress killing you:

  • Increased heart rate
  • Sweating
  • Pressure in chest
  • Shallow breathing
  • Increased body temperature
  • Low energy
  • Clammy hands
  • Feeling down or depressed
  • Repetitive thoughts about one topic
  • Feeling hopeless
  • Increased irritability or
  • Increased substance us
  • The following are the six proven ways to reduce stress:

  • Slow things down
  • Exercise
  • Get in the green
  • Smile
  • Stand upright
  • Try to see your stress as a challenge.
  • Treatment for stress relief usually involves a combination of methods that can include lifestyle changes, counselling, and relaxation or stress-management techniques.

    These are some tips on how/ to stop stress:

  • Raise your awareness throughout the day. Always realize that thinking too much defeats the purpose.
  • When you raise awareness, immediately start observing your thoughts.
  • Only limit your thinking to specific moments that you need it.
  • Enjoy your life!
  • Uncontrolled stress in the workplace can include physical impacts such as sleep disturbances, headaches, stomach upset and raised blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.

    Stress contributes to decreased organisational performance, decreased employee overall performance, high error rate and poor quality of work, high staff turnover, and absenteeism due to health problems such as anxiety, emotional disorder; work-life imbalance; depression and other forms of ailments such as frequent.

    Job stress is considered rising and has become a challenge for the employer and because high-level stress results in low productivity, increased absenteeism and collection to other employee problems like alcoholism, drug abuse, hypertension and a host of cardiovascular problems.

    The study concluded that reduced productivity could also result when an employee is experiencing negative work-induced stress. Organisations are little aware that forcing an employee to work too much or for longer hours can make them stressed, and in the long run, the productivity of the organisation can be affected.

    Stress can cause or exacerbate many serious health problems, including Mental health problems, such as depression, anxiety, and personality disorders. Obesity and other eating disorders.

    Too much stress can cause minor problems such as sleep loss, irritability, backaches, or headaches, and can also contribute to potentially life-threatening diseases such as high blood pressure and heart disease.

    Some of the factors that commonly cause work-related stress include:

  • Long hours
  • Heavy workload
  • Changes within the organisation
  • Tight deadlines
  • Changes to duties
  • Job insecurity
  • Lack of autonomy
  • Boring work
  • Insufficient skills for the job
  • Over-supervision
  • UInadequate working environment
  • Lack of proper resources
  • Lack of equipment
  • Few promotional opportunities
  • Harassment
  • Discrimination
  • Poor relationships with colleagues or bosses
  • Crisis incidents, such as an armed hold-up or workplace death.
  • These are some benefits of preventing stress in the workplace:

  • Reduced symptoms of poor mental and physical health
  • Fewer injuries, less illness and lost time
  • Reduced sick leave usage, absences and staff turnover
  • Increased productivity
  • Greater job satisfaction
  • Increased work engagement
  • Reduced costs to the employer
  • Improved employee health and community wellbeing.
  • Stress contributes to decreased organisational performance, decreased employee overall performance, high error rate and poor quality of work, high staff turnover, and absenteeism due to health problems such as anxiety, emotional disorder; work-life imbalance; depression and other forms of ailments such as frequent.

    It is important for employers to recognise work-related stress as a significant health and safety issue. A company can and should take steps to ensure that employees are not subjected to unnecessary stress, including:

  • Ensure a safe working environment.
  • Make sure that everyone is properly trained for their job.
  • De-stigmatise work-related stress by openly recognising it as a genuine problem.
  • Discuss issues and grievances with employees, and take appropriate action when possible.
  • Devise a stress management policy in consultation with the employees.
  • Encourage an environment where employees have more say over their duties, promotional prospects and safety.
  • Organise to have a human resources manager.
  • Cut down on the need for overtime by reorganising duties or employing extra staff.
  • Take into account the personal lives of employees and recognise that the demands of a home will sometimes clash with the demands of work.
  • Seek advice from health professionals, if necessary
  • When functioning as a motivator, work-related stress results in creativity and satisfaction and consequently removes boredom and mundanity. Stress leads to aggression and low job satisfaction when it functions as a negative factor. Job satisfaction may protect workers from stressors.

    High levels of cortisol can wear down the brain's ability to function properly. Stress can kill brain cells and even reduce the size of the brain. Chronic stress has a shrinking effect on the prefrontal cortex, the area of the brain responsible for memory and learning.

    Stress hormones affect your respiratory and cardiovascular systems. During the stress response, you breathe faster in an effort to quickly distribute oxygen-rich blood to your body. Stress hormones cause your blood vessels to constrict and divert more oxygen to your muscles so you'll have more strength to take action.

    Over time, continued strain on your body from routine stress may contribute to serious health problems, such as heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and other illnesses, as well as mental disorders like depression or anxiety.

    This are some consequences of long-term stress:

  • Mental health problems, such as depression, anxiety, and personality disorders.
  • Cardiovascular disease, including heart disease, high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, heart attacks, and stroke.
  • Obesity and other eating disorders.
  • Menstrual problems.
  • Sexual dysfunction, such as impotence and premature ejaculation in men and loss of sexual desire in both men and women.
  • Skin and hair problems, such as acne, psoriasis, and eczema, and permanent hair loss.
  • Gastrointestinal problems, such as GERD, gastritis, ulcerative colitis, and irritable colon.
  • Short term: You may feel butterflies in your stomach, pain, or nausea, or might even vomit. Your appetite can change and you can have diarrhoea, constipation, or heartburn. Long term: Stress can lead to severe chronic pain and changes in your eating habits. You can also develop acid reflux.

    Here are some people may help you when you are getting stressed:

  • Your doctor
  • Psychologist
  • Your manager
  • Human resources manager at your workplace
  • WorkCover Advisory Service
  • This way up - Click here for Coping with Stress at Work

  • According to research, employees suffering from stress are prone to a sharp rise in sick days. A researcher discovered that stress, acute medical conditions and poor mental health are the most common causes of long-term absence within the workplace.

    Stress is key for survival, but too much stress can be detrimental. Emotional stress that stays around for weeks or months can weaken the immune system and cause high blood pressure, fatigue, depression, anxiety and even heart disease. In particular, too much epinephrine can be harmful to your heart.

    The body has a system of hormonal checks and balances that may actually promote weight gain when you're stressed out. Therefore, chronic stress, or poorly managed stress, may lead to elevated cortisol levels that stimulate your appetite, with the end result being weight gain or difficulty losing unwanted pounds.

    Women are more likely to report that money (79 percent compared with 73 percent of men) and the economy (68 per cent compared with 61 per cent of men) are sources of stress while men are far more likely to cite that work is a source of stress (76 percent compared with 65 percent of women).

    Ideally, someone would aim to achieve the Care Certificate when they first start work as a Healthcare Support Workers or Adult Social Care Worker.

    There is no fixed time for when someone should achieve the certificate. However, on average, it takes 12 weeks to complete the certificate. Thus, starting sooner rather than later is recommended.

    But when chronic stress is experienced, the body makes more cortisol than it has a chance to release. Stress can kill brain cells and even reduce the size of the brain. Chronic stress has a shrinking effect on the prefrontal cortex, the area of the brain responsible for memory and learning.

    It can take a serious toll on your well-being. Research says dwelling on your shortcomings, mistakes, and problems increases your risk of mental health problems. And as your mental health declines, your tendency to ruminate increases, which can lead to a vicious cycle that is hard to break.

    Every weakness should be one that, within a professional setting, you learned from. Please note, this should be different from a strength that you are passing off as a weakness. Saying you are a perfectionist is not a weakness, however, saying that you often question yourself and overthink project outcomes is.

    Overthinking is linked to psychological problems, like depression and anxiety. It's likely that overthinking causes mental health to decline and as your mental health declines, the more likely you are to overthink. It's a vicious downward spiral.

    The gene comes in two variations, met158 and val158, and the people who are most likely to be anxious are those who have inherited both copies of the met158 gene variant from each of their parents.

    Both chronic stress and stress-related disorders, such as anxiety and depression, increase the risk for heart disease, although scientists are not entirely sure why. And the shock of sudden, intense stress, such as the death of a partner, can rapidly weaken the heart, possibly because of a surge of stress hormones.

    Stress is the feeling of being under too much mental or emotional pressure. Most people will feel stressed at times, but persistent stress can adversely affect both your physical and psychological health. Common signs of stress include sleeping problems, sweating, loss of appetite and difficulty concentrating.

    Ongoing, chronic stress, however, can cause or exacerbate many serious health problems, including Mental health problems, such as depression, anxiety, and personality disorders. Cardiovascular disease, including heart disease, high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, heart attacks, and stroke.

    Stress factors broadly fall into four types or categories:

  • Physical stress
  • Psychological stress
  • Psychosocial stress
  • Psychospiritual stress.
  • Big stressors include money troubles, job issues, relationship conflicts, and major life changes, such as the loss of a loved one. Smaller stressors, such as long daily commutes and rushed mornings, can also add up over time. Learning how to recognise sources of stress in your life is the first step in managing them.

    Stress management is a wide spectrum of techniques and psychotherapies aimed at controlling a person's level of stress, especially chronic stress, usually for the purpose of and for the motive of improving everyday functioning.

    These are the top 10 tips on how to help stress management:

  • Avoid caffeine, alcohol, and nicotine.
  • Indulge in physical activity.
  • Get more sleep.
  • Try relaxation techniques.
  • Talk to someone.
  • Keep a stress diary.
  • Take control.
  • Manage your time.
  • Learn to say ‘no’.
  • Rest if you are unwell
  • Types of coping with stress strategies:

  • releasing pent-up emotions.
  • distracting oneself.
  • managing hostile feelings.
  • meditating.
  • using systematic relaxation procedures.
  • These are positive coping with stress skills:

  • Practising meditation and relaxation techniques;
  • Having time to yourself;
  • Engaging in physical activity or exercise; meditation and relaxation coping skills worksheets
  • Reading;
  • Spending time with friends;
  • Finding humour;
  • Spending time on your hobbies;
  • Engaging in spirituality;
  • Spending quality time with your pets;
  • Getting a good night’s sleep;
  • Eating healthy.
  • The Mandatory Training Group is the leading UK provider of accredited statutory and mandatory training courses for all sectors, including health, safety and wellbeing, social care, education, local government, and many more. Click here for Coping with Stress at Work

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    FREE Coping with Workplace Stress - E-Learning Course

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