Statutory & Mandatory Training Courses for Healthcare Professionals - Online Mandatory Training for Healthcare Workers - 

Statutory & Mandatory Training Courses for Healthcare Professionals

Providing statutory and mandatory training is a key investment by NHS and healthcare employers, and despite budget constraints and time concerns, it can play a crucial role in ensuring a high level of care to patients. This article outlines guidance across health and social care, with tips for sector specialisms. To find quality Mandatory Training providers, search here on the MTG E-Learning Platform.

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Statutory and mandatory healthcare training and CQC compliance

When discussing issues of compliance, particularly in relation to training and qualifications, we often see the terms ‘statutory training’ and ‘mandatory training’, which explain certain types of training that employees have to take as part of their job.

The issue is that these two phrases can sometimes be a little confusing for both employees and employers, particularly as in everyday speech, the words ‘statutory’ and ‘mandatory’ can often mean roughly the same thing, and things that are statutory are generally also mandatory.

However, when it comes to these two terms, they aren’t quite the same, and it helps to understand what they mean. This is especially true in health and social care, where these terms are most commonly encountered. In this article, we’re going to take a look at what these phrases mean, why they’re different, and what they cover.

What do we mean by mandatory training?

Many organisations use the term mandatory training as a ‘catch all’ to cover mandatory and statutory training. The Royal College of Nursing (RCN) have a useful distinction between the terms 'statutory training' and 'mandatory training' for nurses.

Statutory training in healthcare definition

Statutory training is that which an organisation is legally required to provide as defined by law or where a statutory body has instructed organisations to provide training on the basis of legislation.

What is mandatory training in healthcare?

Mandatory training is compulsory training that is determined essential by an organisation for the safe and efficient delivery of services. This type of training is designed to reduce organisational risks and comply with local or national policies and government guidelines.

For the purposes of this article, we will be using mandatory training as the catch-all phrase throughout.

Click here to find out more about statutory and mandatory training guidance from the Royal College of Nursing.

What are mandatory trainings?

Mandatory training is legally required and compulsory in order for employees to complete their job safely and efficiently. It may have come from government guidelines or legislation or it may be training that an organisation deems essential for their employees or specific job roles.

Why is mandatory training important in healthcare?

Mandatory training is learning deemed essential for safe and efficient service delivery and personal safety. It reduces organisational risks and complies with local policies and/or government guidelines. In healthcare settings, mandatory training may relate to general workplace practice or be specific to your role.

What courses are mandatory in health and social care?

The most common mandatory training subjects for care homes include:

  • Health and Safety at Work
  • Fire Safety Awareness
  • Equality, Diversity and Human Rights
  • Resuscitation/First Aid at Work
  • Infection, Prevention and Control
  • Manual Handling of Objects
  • Food Hygiene/Food Safety Awareness
  • Information Governance
  • Safeguarding Adults
  • Safeguarding Children
  • People Moving and Handling.

Click here to find out more about the modules that are included in statutory and mandatory training for health and social care workers.

What is statutory and mandatory training NHS?

Statutory training is required to ensure that NHS Trusts meet their legislative duties. Mandatory training is an organisational requirement to limit risk and maintain safe working practices.

Click here to find out more about the difference between mandatory and statutory training in the NHS and other healthcare settings.

Is mandatory training in healthcare really mandatory?

Yes, mandatory training is indeed mandatory for all healthcare workers. The Care Quality Commission (CQC), commissioners and regulatory frameworks require that all healthcare professionals must complete appropriate statutory and mandatory training courses, including annual updates and refresher courses.

Who pays for mandatory training?

If you earn the National Minimum Wage or close to it then your employer should pay you for time spent on mandatory training.

Click here to find out more about getting paid for mandatory training from the Acas website.

How does training improve patient care?

Education and training can break down barriers to providing safe care, creating an environment where all staff learn from error, patients are at the centre of care, treated with openness and honesty and where staff are trained to focus on patient needs.

Click here to find out more about improving safety through education and training in healthcare settings.

Why is training so important in health and social care?

Training enables staff to provide better basic care, for instance, helping people to get dressed, get out of bed and bathe. It also focuses on aspects like dispensing medication, promoting dignity, basic nutrition and hydration, and using equipment like hoists and lifts safely.

Find out more about the importance of training health and social care staff.

Is there a difference between statutory and mandatory training?

What is mandatory training?

Mandatory training is the phrase most commonly encountered (though it can mean different things as we’ll cover shortly), and the key to remembering what it covers is to consider it more specific to the role itself rather than the sector that the role is in.

You will generally find that mandatory training takes place when an employee is inducted into a role, and the various elements of it are considered important to carry out the job effectively and safely. It’s important to note that mandatory training is sometimes legally required as well as being considered essential by management, but that doesn’t always mean that the training is statutory rather than mandatory.

What is statutory training?

This then brings us onto statutory training itself. Statutory training is usually more sector-specific, and you’ll find that it’s most commonly encountered in the care and healthcare sector. When we talk about statutory training, we’re generally talking about sector-specific training that is legally required as part of running a service. This can come from the central government, local authorities, or other governing bodies. Various commissioning groups too will insist upon certain types of training. The idea is that this type of training is essential to running a safe and effective care service.

Much of the confusion arises because both types of training are considered compulsory or essential by the employer, so it’s difficult to work out which is which. And in truth, in many cases, it’s not particularly significant as to which type of training in which, provided the employer is meeting the obligations of any governing body, and the employee has the skills they need. Further complicating things is that within some organisations and even training providers, the phrase ‘mandatory training’ covers both mandatory and statutory training types, because after all, statutory training is mandatory.

How is statutory training applied in practice?

In order to help understand a little more about statutory training and what it is, we’re going to take a quick look at some examples of what might be considered statutory.

The Care Quality Commission is an executive department of the Department of Health and Social Care, and it’s responsible for overseeing standards of health and social care businesses and organisations in the United Kingdom. It regulates and inspects these organisations, which means that it is responsible for deciding which types of training are essential to carrying out a good service in this respect. As a result, if it mandates any training as a result of legislation, this training would be considered to be statutory.

Under CQC rules, and indeed various other pieces of legislation, including broad-remit ones such as the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, there are a variety of types of training that everyone under their remit must take. Manual handling, fire safety, risk assessment, control of substances hazardous to health (COSHH) and incident reporting are the most frequently encountered types of statutory training in the health and social care sector.

How is mandatory training applied in practice?

Now we know a little more about statutory training, and how the phrases are used, we can see that mandatory training is generally a little bit different. Mandatory training isn’t necessarily insisted upon by legislation (though it may be in other industries, organisations or roles), but is still essential for getting the job done effectively and safely.

Food hygiene training is a good example of training that is, within the care industry, often considered mandatory but is not statutory. Let’s take a care home for example. Looking after the elderly residents means being aware of every aspect of their wellbeing, and as a result, it’s important that all of the food that they are eating is safe to eat. Care staff and chefs working at the premises may not be legally required to undertake food hygiene training, but that doesn’t mean that the organisation doesn’t think it’s essential that they do.

Similarly, if we think about some of the skills that are essential to carrying out various roles in the health and social care sector, we realise that there are many different types of training that would almost certainly be considered essential to a role. Safeguarding is a very important part of many jobs, but individual staff training for specific roles is not necessarily legally mandated. Overall safeguarding responsibilities for the organisation might be legally observed, but not necessarily down to role level. As a result, things like safeguarding children and adults are often types of mandatory training that particular members of staff must undertake.

Manual handling is another good example. While several pieces of legislation do insist that employers mandate manual handling training, it may be the case that certain employees need different and more specific types of training essential to their role. In health and social care, moving people might be an important task, so specific training for this type of handling might be mandatory.

What is the difference between statutory and mandatory training?

If you’re still finding it difficult to discern which type of training in which, remember that in simple terms, statutory training is compulsory because of laws, mandatory training is compulsory because of the job role, but both types are technically mandatory, and as a result, in some instances, you’ll hear mandatory refer to all types of training that a person has to undertake, for whatever reason.

You can see more examples about the different training types in this article about the NHS specifically.

What is mandatory training for nurses and care staff?

The Mandatory Training Group have developed an 'NHS Agency Mandatory Training Package for Nurses and Care Staff'. These statutory and mandatory training bundles are aligned to the Skills for Health's UK Core Skills Training Framework (CSTF).

The mandatory training courses for nurses and care staff are:

  • Conflict resolution
  • Equality, diversity and human rights
  • Fire safety
  • Health, safety and welfare
  • Infection prevention and control
  • Information governance and data security
  • Moving and handling
  • Preventing Radicalisation
  • Resuscitation
  • Safeguarding adults
  • Safeguarding children.

Why is mandatory training important in nursing?

Mandatory training ensures that nurses have the right knowledge and skills to carry out their duties in the safest ways possible, minimising any risk to themselves and others. Health and safety regulations and guidance help to make sure staff have a safe working environment.

What is mandatory healthcare training?

Mandatory training in healthcare is determined essential by an organisation for safe and efficient running in order to reduce organisational risks and comply with policies, government guidelines.

What is statutory and mandatory training?

Statutory training is required to ensure that the Trust is meeting any legislative duties. Mandatory training is an organisational requirement to limit risk and maintain a safe working practice.

Is mandatory training paid?

Legally, you do not have to pay employees if they request time off for training or study that isn't required for them to carry out their job. So, employees should be paid for any time that's taken to undertake this. This approach applies to all mandatory/statutory training requirements.

How important is mandatory training?

Mandatory training is training that has been deemed essential for an organisation to do to ensure it's meeting required policy and regulatory standards. These aren't necessary but your organization has decided that it's mandatory in order to protect and improve your organization.

Why are mandatory courses important?

Mandatory training helps to create a work culture that encourages equality and better working relationships. Mandatory training also helps you feel more confident when you are performing your duties and build professionalism, for example in training related to confidentiality.

What are the 5 things healthcare professionals need to know about mandatory training?

As a healthcare professional, your safety as well as the safety and welfare of patients, partially depend on you. That is why getting all the right skills is crucial. The right knowledge will help you to deal with common situations that arise in the workplace.

If you want to kick start your healthcare career, there is one term that you need to be familiar with - 'mandatory training'. What do you need to know about mandatory training for healthcare professionals?

Here are 5 things you need to know about mandatory training for healthcare professionals:

  1. the meaning of mandatory training for healthcare workers
  2. healthcare employer obligations for mandatory training
  3. mandatory training updates (refresher mandatory training)
  4. the difference between mandatory and statutory training
  5. the importance of mandatory training for healthcare workers.

What is the meaning of mandatory training for healthcare workers?

Without mandatory training, you cannot work in the NHS or other healthcare settings. Mandatory training ensures that you can safely and effectively perform your duties as a healthcare professional. It includes training for record-keeping, conflict handling, consent, incident reporting, hand hygiene, and more.

Healthcare employer obligations for mandatory training

If you are employed, your employer can pay for your training which will count as a part of your work schedule. Whether or not your employer pays for your training will depend on the framework under which they are operating.

The NHS provides training to its employees to meet certain standards for better health, risk management, and quality care inspection.

Your employer may be obliged to provide training based on factors such as legal and country-specific obligations, the riskiness of the working environment, and the need for equality.

Mandatory training updates and refresher courses for healthcare workers

Mandatory training for nurses should be and is updated regularly. In most cases, these updates are annual. The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) does not dictate how often training should take place. Nevertheless, it requires nurses to have the latest skills. Your employer is free to set training schedules under which you should comply.

The Difference between healthcare mandatory and statutory training

Statutory training is that which is required by law, where employers must provide training to meet the requirements of particular regulations.

For example, to meet the requirements of the Health and Safety at Work Act, employees need training in areas such as manual handling and fire safety awareness and updates; and basic risk assessment. Other areas of training under the Act include reporting injuries, diseases, and dangerous occurrences (RIDDOR) and the control of substances hazardous to health (COSHH).

At times, you will come across terms such as ‘essential’ and ‘compulsory’ training. Employers can use these terms to describe both mandatory and statutory training.

The importance of mandatory training for healthcare professionals

Apart from ensuring a safe working environment for yourself and effective care for patients, mandatory training also helps to:

  • Create a work culture that encourages equality and better working relationships.
  • Training also helps you feel more confident when you are performing your duties.
  • Build professionalism, for example in training related to confidentiality.

Healthcare statutory and mandatory training summary

Whether you are joining the nursing profession or are already practising, mandatory training is crucial to effective performance at work. The training should be a continuous process, ensuring you keep up with the latest updates so that you can keep safe and perform your duties ethically and professionally at all times.

What is statutory and mandatory training NHS?

Statutory training is required to ensure that the Trust is meeting any legislative duties. Mandatory training is an organisational requirement to limit risk and maintain a safe working practice.

Do employers have to pay for mandatory training UK?

If you earn the National Minimum Wage or close to it then your employer should pay you for time spent on mandatory training. This is because the pay received compared to the hours worked in the pay reference period might bring you below the National Minimum Wage.

How often should mandatory training take place?

Some mandatory training courses must be renewed annually, while other mandatory courses are refreshed every three years.

Provide learning and development opportunities when identified or required and at least every 3 years.

What are the mandatory training courses for care workers?

The common mandatory training courses for health and social care support workers are:

  • Health and Safety at Work
  • Resuscitation/First Aid at Work
  • Food Hygiene/Food Safety
  • Manual Handling of Objects
  • Moving and Handling of People
  • Safeguarding Vulnerable Adults
  • Safeguarding Children
  • Infection Prevention and Control
  • Equality, Diversity and Human Rights
  • Documentation and Record-Keeping
  • Emergency First Aid at Work.

Click here to find out more about statutory and mandatory training for health and social care support workers.

What is mandatory training in health and social care?

Mandatory training is the training you are expected to provide for your staff following statutory requirements such as the Health and Safety at Work Act, requirements of your local authority, and the requirements specified by the CQC.

Is mandatory training a legal requirement?

Mandatory training is legally required and compulsory in order for an employee to complete their job safely and efficiently. It may have come from government guidelines or legislation or it may be training that an organisation deems essential for their employees or specific job roles.

Are Mandatory Training Courses different to Statutory Training Courses?

Statutory training relates to training this is required legally in order to protect individuals in the workplace.  Mandatory training relates to trade specific training that the employer considers essential or compulsory for a specific job.  Both phrases are often confused by employers.  This article covers a list of mandatory social care training courses and looks at those that are statutory within the confines of the CQC.

Statutory training vs mandatory training in healthcare

At TutorCare we are often asked if there are any courses that need to be taken in order to ensure compliance in the workplace. While regulations may have wide-ranging implications across a number of sectors it is important to understand that your role in a sector may dictate specifically what is needed.

In theory, mandatory training is a compulsory requirement for employees based on the job. It is not sector-specific but more focused on the role. It is usually provided as part of any mandatory induction training, with annual follow-ups thereafter. Annual training is often referred to as an ‘annual training refresher’, or an ‘annual training update’. There may or may not be a legal requirement to undertake this training, but it has been decided by management that is compulsory for the employee.

Statutory training relates to training that is required by law to ensure that an organisation is meeting their legislative duties. All Care Quality Commission (CQC) regulated organisations (private care homes, the NHS etc.) for example have a responsibility to ensure that all new employees undertake core health and safety awareness training courses. Failure to meet these requirements will result in penalties including fines.

So, social care organisations use the term statutory for compulsory training?

Not necessarily. The term ‘mandatory training’ is most commonly used in the care industry but is typically a ‘catch all’ phrase covering both statutory and mandatory training courses. Organisations such as the NHS, private hospitals, care homes and other health and social care bodies routinely treat such training as essential regardless of whether it is a legislative requirement. As employers, they have a responsibility for medical, nursing and care staff to work in a safe manner and as such treat all training as essential. Not to mention an obligation to their patients.

Confused, it gets worse…

All employers regardless of the sector are required to meet specific requirements set out by the Health and Safety at Work Act of 1974. They are also required to abide by the Management of Health and Safety at Work regulations 1999 Act. However, depending upon the level of risk in the role, the requirements differ – meaning that while everyone must abide by the act, not everyone is required to undertake a training course on health and safety.

Let’s try and break this down.

Statutory training is a requirement where a statutory body has instructed organisations to provide certain training on the basis of specific legislation.

Therefore, the CQC would require that regulated organisations under their umbrella ensure employees undertake the following courses:

  • awareness of the local authority health and safety policy
  • awareness of the control of substances hazardous to health (COSHH)
  • manual handling training
  • basic risk assessment training
  • how and when to report injuries, diseases and dangerous occurrences (RIDDOR)
  • fire safety awareness training.

By ensuring that all staff undertake the above courses with refreshers each year, the organisation is abiding by their legislative duties under the various acts but also their statutory requirements as set out by the CQC.

    So, is Statutory training mandatory?

    If your employer refers to statutory training, then you can assume that it is mandatory. It is essential for the job based on their legal requirements. If an employer refers to mandatory training, it may be the result of a statutory requirement, but it may also just be a requirement for the job. For example, an employer in the retail sector may require you to undertake “Complaints handling” as a mandatory course for your role but it isn’t a legal requirement.

    It is, therefore, safe to assume, that any mandatory training is a requirement for a job. Simply put, you can’t do the role without it, either due to legislation (statutory) or your employers business needs. The alternative would be an optional vocational course that allows the individual to advance their skills in a specific vocation, either in work time (if you are lucky enough to have a forward-thinking employer) or in your own time. These training courses would help further your career but aren’t necessary for you to perform the basics of the given role.

    OK, so what can be classed as mandatory training?

    Training can be defined as mandatory where it meets one or more of the following criteria:

    • It is a statutory requirement due to legislation.
    • It is a requirement by a specific body – Local Authority, Care Quality Commission or Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency.
    • Staff across an organisation require training to perform their job (i.e. health and safety in a manufacturing plant).

    A role that requires specific training in order for an employee to complete a task (i.e. CHAINSAWS AND SKILL SAWS TRAINING, AutoCAD training, PAT testing training or any vocational specific course).

    Examples of mandatory social care training courses that aren’t necessarily statutory.

    If you’ve managed to get this far, well done. The courses outlined earlier in this article as statutory are a requirement by the CQC to ensure the organisation meets their legal obligations. The following list are courses you may need to go on in your role in the health and social care sector that are classed as mandatory training depending upon the job you have. (Please note this list in not exhaustive).

    • Safeguarding children training (residential care workers, teachers, foster care workers)
    • Safeguarding vulnerable adults training (care home workers, nurses)
    • Nutrition and hydration training (chefs, nurses)
    • Basic life support (BLS) training (nurses, care home assistants, teachers, domestic care workers – most none admin based NHS staff)
    • Automated external defibrillator (AED) training (nurses, midwives – most care staff)
    • Anaphylaxis training (most care staff)
    • Consent training (nurses, midwives)
    • Conflict management and challenging behaviour training (most care staff)
    • Safe moving and handling of people training (most none admin based NHS staff or private home care employees)
    • Medicines management training (care home staff, nurses, midwives)
    • Food hygiene and food safety awareness training (chefs, care home staff, nurses).

    At The Mandatory Training Group, we offer a wide range of statutory, mandatory and optional courses for those working in the health and social care sector. Our solutions include options for those for preferences in classroom learning, on-site training or online e-learning courses. In total, we provide over 1000 courses to organisations across the UK.

    What topics should be covered within mandatory training for healthcare workers?

    Here is the list of statutory and mandatory training subjects for healthcare professionals:

    • Conflict resolution
    • Equality, diversity and human rights
    • Fire safety
    • Health, safety and welfare
    • Infection prevention and control
    • Information governance and data security
    • Moving and handling
    • Preventing Radicalisation
    • Resuscitation
    • Safeguarding adults
    • Safeguarding children.

    What is included in mandatory training?

    Mandatory training ensures that you can safely and effectively perform your duties in an organisation. It includes training for record-keeping, conflict handling, consent, incident reporting, hand hygiene, and more.

    What mandatory training should be given to employees?

    The first and foremost mandatory training for any workforce is to do with health and safety. The Health and Safety First Aid Regulations 1981 state that employers will need to make sure that their first aid facilities, equipment and number of trained first aiders adequately and appropriately fits the workplace's need.

    Click here to find out more about what mandatory training is required for health and social care providers in the UK.

    What should be included in health and safety training?

    The following should be included in employee health and safety training:

    • Induction training
    • workplace orientation
    • fire safety and emergency procedures
    • first aid at work
    • health and safety (such as risk assessments or accident reporting procedures)
    • welfare facilities
    • safe use of workplace tools, machinery, equipment
    • risk assessments
    • maintenance or storage of personal protective equipment.

    What does the care certificate cover?

    The Care Certificate is an agreed set of standards that define the knowledge, skills and behaviours expected of specific job roles in the health and social care sectors.

    It's made up of the 15 minimum standards that should be covered if you are 'new to care' and should form part of a robust induction programme.

    What is mandatory training in the NHS?

    Mandatory training is compulsory training that is determined essential by an organisation for the safe and efficient delivery of services. This type of training is designed to reduce organisational risks and comply with local or national policies and government guidelines.

    What is the difference between statutory and mandatory training NHS?

    Statutory training is required to ensure that the Trust is meeting any legislative duties. Mandatory training is an organisational requirement to limit risk and maintain the safe working practice.

    Skills for Health UK Core Skills Training Framework

    To help harmonise mandatory training for NHS and healthcare workers. Skills for Health developed the Statutory/Mandatory Core Skills Training Framework.

    This provides an effective framework upon which training can follow. The subjects in the statutory/mandatory Core Skills Training Framework are as follows:

    • Equality, Diversity and Human Rights
    • Health, Safety and Welfare
    • NHS Conflict Resolution
    • Fire Safety
    • Infection Prevention and Control
    • Moving and Handling
    • Safeguarding Adults
    • Preventing Radicalisation
    • Safeguarding Children
    • Resuscitation
    • Information Governance.

    These core skills and subjects all play a key role in the smooth, efficient and effective running of any healthcare organisation. Whether staff are being trained for the first time or are having their skills refreshed, this knowledge and the techniques provided all hold vital importance in the safety and level of care provided to patients.

    Skills for Health have also launched specialist core skills training frameworks in the following topics:

    • Dementia Core Skills Education and Training Framework (England)
    • Learning Disabilities Core Skills Education and Training Framework
    • Mental Health Core Skills Education and Training Framework
    • End of Life Care Core Skills Education and Training Framework.

    Mandatory Training Adapted to the Workplace

    In addition to the guidelines from Skills for Health’s Core Skills Framework, Mandatory training needs to adapt to the needs of the individual workplace, with guidelines available for specialist health and care sectors.

    Mandatory Training and the Care Certificate

    The Care Certificate is a set of standards for health and social care workers produced with the aim of standardising introductory skills, knowledge and behaviours. The goal is to ensure compassionate, safe and high-quality care. More information can be found here.

    The 2013 Cavendish Review found that the preparation of healthcare assistants and social care support workers for their roles providing care was inconsistent. The report recommended the development of a Certificate of Fundamental Care – the “Care Certificate”.

    The Care Certificate is for new staff as part of an induction. The Care Certificate isn’t mandatory per se, but there is still an expectation. The Care Quality Commission will look to ensure that whatever the organisation is doing with its training covers the requirements of the Care Certificate.

    This primary audience is Healthcare Support Workers or Adult Social Care Workers. These fields consist of Health Care Assistants, Assistant Practitioners, Care Support Workers and those giving support to clinical roles in the NHS where there is any direct contact with patients. “Care Support Workers” includes the following:

    • Health Care Assistance
    • Assistant Practitioners
    • Those giving support to clinical roles with direct patient contact
    • Care Support Workers consisting of the following:
    • Adult Social Care workers in residential, nursing homes and hospices.
    • Home care workers,
    • Domiciliary care staff.

    Other social care roles include:

    • Caring volunteers
    • Porters
    • Cooks
    • Drivers with direct contact with patients/ service users.

    Mandatory Training for Care Homes and Hospices

    It is up to the healthcare provider to ensure staff are qualified, experienced and competent. The topics for mandatory training will be in line with the Care Certificate, with additional training for additional topics such as Control of Substances Hazardous to Health, Caldicott Principles and Food Hygiene. As those working in care homes often go beyond the role of nursing to provide extra support and care to patients, it is especially crucial that they understand aspects such as food safety.

    Likewise, knowledge of fire safety can potentially save lives in the event of an emergency. Infection control can play a crucial role in ensuring illnesses, bacteria and viruses are not spread throughout a care home, which could prove fatal with vulnerable patients all living under one roof. There would also be the potential of legal cases if an infection was to spread and it was found that staff had not followed key training and management procedures.

    Mandatory Training for GP Surgeries

    In addition to the Core Skills, Training framework surgeries will have their own strategies in place for their doctors and nurses. It is expected that each organisation will provide statutory/mandatory training depending on the needs of the practice and their staff.

    It is specified under the Health and Social Care Act 2008 that all healthcare providers will have sufficient numbers of staff who are suitably qualified, skilled, and experienced for the visitors to the practice at all times. Some basic examples of training that would be expected at all practices include basic life support, fire safety training, infection control, knowledge of the Mental Capacity Act and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards, as well as training to an appropriate level for the safeguarding of children and adults who are at risk.

    The CQC will undertake inspections to check that staff have the necessary qualifications and skills. They will check when the individual started their employment, what responsibilities they hold, and how the healthcare provider has been seeking to meet the learning needs of their team. They will also examine what training has been held and whether they can see evidence of this training. They may ask for this to be demonstrated to them.

    Mandatory Training for Nurses

    The CQC team will make inspections to check levels of training, and ensure all staff that are working are considered to be experienced, knowledgeable, responsible, qualified, competent, and skilled. They may be required to demonstrate these skills during an inspection, for example, showing that they can administer a vaccine, take samples for the cervical screening programme, take a blood sample, treat minor illnesses, explain the fire safety and evacuation procedures, and demonstrate safe moving and handling of patients.

    The RCN break down mandatory training into statutory core health and safety and mandatory training options.

    Core health and safety awareness and training for healthcare professionals

    This usually includes:

    • Awareness of the local health and safety policy
    • Awareness of the control of substances hazardous to health (COSHH)
    • When and how to report injuries, diseases and dangerous occurrences (RIDDOR)
    • Fire safety awareness training
    • Manual handling training
    • Basic risk assessment training
    • Annual updates in essential areas of fire safety and manual handling.
    • Mandatory training might include:
    • Complaints handling
    • Conflict resolution (managing violence and aggression)
    • Consent
    • Display and screen equipment
    • Incident reporting
    • Hand hygiene
    • Hazardous substances
    • Infection prevention and control
    • Information governance
    • Mental capacity and safeguarding adults
    • Medicines handling and management.

    CSTF (All in One Day) Mandatory Training for Healthcare Workers

    Trusted, Quality Assured Training Content.

    We are the UK’s only Healthcare Training Provider to hold both the Quality Mark and Excellence Centre status for the content and delivery of our training courses.

    We've upgraded your Mandatory training package! Previously you may have completed either 'All in One Day' Mandatory training OR CSTF Mandatory + Statutory training, we've merged both courses to make it CSTF Aligned AND All in One Day!

    This new flexible training package meets all of your Mandatory training requirements.

    Who is CSTF (All in One Day) mandatory training for?

    CSTF (All in One Day) Mandatory Training is a yearly refresher course for all healthcare professionals whether part-time, full time or agency workers.

    This course is aligned to the UK Core Skills Training Framework (CSTF) which meets all major Framework training requirements. If you are an agency or organisation looking to book multiple staff for training, please apply for an account here.

    Please note - Mandatory + Statutory Training is a yearly refresher course and is not suitable for candidates without prior healthcare experience, including care workers. See link: Mandatory VS Care Certificate PDF.

    How do I book for CSTF mandatory training for healthcare workers?

    To secure your place, you will need to book online. Select the venue and date on the right-hand side of this page and click the 'book now' button to be taken to the booking form. Please be aware, many of these courses fill up quickly!

    What is covered in the CSTF mandatory annual refresher training?

    This classroom-based training day includes the essential practical elements of Manual Handling and Resuscitation.:

    • CSTF Infection Prevention & Control Levels 1 and 2
    • CSTF Information Governance - Inclusive of Counter Fraud
    • CSTF Fire Safety
    • CSTF NHS Conflict Resolution - Inclusive of Complaints Handling + Lone Working
    • CSTF Safeguarding Adults Level 1 and 2 - Inclusive of Mental Health & Mental Capacity
    • CSTF Safeguarding Children Level 1 and 2
    • CSTF Moving & Handling Level 1 and 2
    • CSTF Resuscitation Level 1 - Inclusive of Anaphylaxis
    • CSTF Resuscitation Level 2 - Adult Basic Life Support
    • CSTF Resuscitation Level 3 - Adult Immediate Life Support

    Optional online modules for health care professionals

    • CSTF Resuscitation - Level 2 - Paediatric Basic Life Support
    • CSTF Resuscitation - Level 3 - Paediatric Immediate Life Support
    • CSTF Resuscitation - Level 2 - New-born Basic Life Support
    • CSTF Resuscitation - Level 3 - New-born Immediate Life Support.

    The OPTIONAL modules shown above are provided on the day at no extra cost. Some healthcare professionals will require these modules depending upon the nature of their work. Those delegates who do not need these modules may leave before these modules start.

    Free e-learning modules for healthcare workers

    When you have completed your booking, you will be given access to the following CPD Accredited Elearning modules, free of charge. Please check with your agency or employer which additional modules they would like you to complete.

    Refresher online courses for healthcare professionals

    • CSTF Health, Safety & Welfare
    • CSTF Equality, Diversity & Human Rights
    • CSTF Preventing Radicalisation.

    E-learning optional modules for healthcare staff (Role dependant - frequency varies)

    • MTG Blood Component Transfusion
    • CSTF Safeguarding Children Level 3
    • MTG Food Hygiene
    • MTG Medication Awareness
    • MTG Physical Restraint Awareness
    • CSTF Safeguarding Adults Level 3
    • MTG Tissue Viability.

    MTG clinical skills mandatory courses for healthcare professionals

    • Your Healthcare Career
    • Duty of Care
    • Privacy & Dignity
    • Person-Centred Care
    • Communication
    • Consent
    • Fluids & Nutrition
    • Dementia Awareness.

    Why train with The Mandatory Training Group?

    • The Mandatory Training Group have been awarded the prestigious Corporate Accreditation from the CPD Certification Service.
    • The Mandatory Training Group are aligned to the CSTF Framework
    • The Mandatory Training Group is a CPD Accredited Training Provider
    • All our professional trainers have approved and appropriate qualifications and experience
    • We deliver proven traditional classroom training, providing healthcare professionals with relevant practical involvement and assessments
    • Independent verification of alignment can also be found on the following web page of the CPD Certification Service website:- CPD Certification Service. The CPD Standards Office have audited and fully accredited The Mandatory Training Group's CSTF Mandatory + Statutory Training Course.

    Mandatory training and NMC revalidation for nurses and midwives

    The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) introduced 'Revalidation' in April 2016. One of the requirements is for nurses to show evidence of 35 hours of Continual Professional Development (CPD) over a 3-year period.

    The Mandatory Training Group's Mandatory training contributes to your participatory CPD hours and certificates can be submitted as CPD evidence for Revalidation.

    Mandatory training for healthcare workers in summary

    In some cases, due to budget constraints within the NHS or staff being overworked and not having enough time to attend training, mandatory training has been overlooked. However, it is not an area that healthcare organisations can afford to become lax with. Not only can training help ensure staff meet all necessary criteria and can perform their duties effectively, but it can also play a key role in their confidence. There is a great need for healthcare organisations to allow their staff to get away from clinical constraints in order to allow them the time to attend mandatory training. This is something that many industry experts are now pushing for.

    To search for quality training providers offering mandatory training, search the CPD Platform’s database or pick a provider.

    Where to find mandatory and statutory training for healthcare workers

    Training is sometimes carried out within an organisation - indeed, larger groups such as the NHS may have their own employees qualified to train in things like fire safety and manual handling. However, for both mandatory and statutory training, businesses and organisations will usually look to external training providers for this service. Sometimes specific, accredited courses must be undertaken, and sometimes they’re more casual and purely knowledge-based. In both cases, online compliance training is increasingly popular as an alternative to away days.

    Here at The Mandatory Training Group, we’re pleased to be able to offer a huge number of courses covering numerous sectors, industries and even specific job roles. Many of our courses will be appropriate for meeting mandatory and statutory requirements, and we’re even able to offer bespoke training using our learning management system.

    Statutory & Mandatory Training Courses for Healthcare Professionals - Online Mandatory Training for Healthcare Professionals - The Mandatory Training Group UK -

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