Resuscitation Courses, Training & Qualifications - Resuscitation Courses & Training - CPR + AED & BLS Training Courses - Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Training Courses - CPR & AED Courses - BLS Courses

Resuscitation Courses, Training & Qualifications Providers in the UK

The Mandatory Training Group is the leading UK provider of accredited cardiopulmonary resuscitation & basic life support training courses for all sectors including NHS Trusts, private healthcare and social care providers in line with current UK guidelines. 

Click here to browse MTG E-Learning courses, including resuscitation and training courses covering adult, paediatric, newborn and neonatal CPR courses.

Resuscitation Courses, Training & Qualifications - Online CPR + BLS & AED Training Courses - The Mandatory Training Group UK -

Click here to see our CPD Certification Service accreditation for our cardiopulmonary resuscitation training courses and programmes.

Accredited resuscitation courses and training providers.

The Mandatory Training Group offers a range of resuscitation training courses designed to train healthcare professionals and Instructors in best resuscitation practice across adult, paediatric and newborn life support.

By taking a Mandatory Training Group resuscitation training course, you and your employer can be assured that you have the most up-to-date knowledge, and the confidence and practical skills to put that knowledge into action.

Our resuscitation courses and qualifications offer many additional benefits, such as CPD eligibility and the ability to use your skills in other countries, with many course certificates being recognised across the EU and in Australia.

Sign up for a course today and find out why countless healthcare professionals across the UK choose to strengthen their skills with a Mandatory Training Group resuscitation course.

What is the importance of resuscitation training?

It is a common expectation that healthcare staff will have sufficient knowledge and skills to be able to recognise and respond to signs of clinical deterioration. Where healthcare staff can anticipate, identify and respond to patient signs of clinical deterioration they can prevent further decline that might otherwise culminate in cardiorespiratory arrest. Consequently, there has been a particular focus in promoting greater awareness and understanding in the needs and care of the deteriorating patient.

What is resuscitation?

Resuscitation is the process of correcting physiological disorders in an acutely ill patient. It is an important part of intensive care medicine, trauma surgery and emergency medicine. Well known examples are cardiopulmonary resuscitation and mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.

What is the primary priority for resuscitation training?

While the priority is on preventing clinical deterioration, some patients’ condition will progress to cardiorespiratory arrest and require cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Early and effective resuscitation can save lives. Research in emergency care of collapsed people has led to significant advances in resuscitation techniques. Healthcare organisations must have a clearly defined resuscitation policy and ensure that they provide an effective resuscitation
response and service. As part of their duty to ensure safe and effective care, healthcare organisations must ensure that their workforce receives the appropriate training, including periodic updates, in order to maintain a level of resuscitation competence relevant to their role.

What are the UK minimum requirements for resuscitation training?

The requirements stated are minimum standards and apply to the majority of the workforce in roles and settings where they might be required to provide initial CPR until the arrival of advanced life support expertise and support.

Resuscitation Courses & Training Providers UK

Online Resuscitation Training Courses - Basic, Immediate and Advanced Life Support Training Courses - Mandatory Compliance eLearning Courses.

MTG E-Learning provides a wide range of online training courses, eLearning programmes and Ofqual qualifications, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training courses in all UK regions.

Click here to find out more about MTG eLearning courses, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) courses and training programmes in the UK.

Which resuscitation training courses are available?

The following resuscitation training courses are available from The Mandatory Training Group:

  • Adult Basic Life Support Training
  • Newborn Life Support Training
  • Paediatric Life Support Training
  • Basic Life Support Train the Trainer
  • e-ILS (Immediate Life Support e-learning) Course
  • ILS (Immediate Life Support) Course
  • ILS Recertification (Immediate Life Support) Course
  • e-ALS (Advanced Life Support) Course
  • ALS: 2 Day Course (Advanced Life Support) Course
  • ALS: Modular (Advanced Life Support) Course
  • ALS: Recertification (Advanced Life Support) Course
  • FEEL (Focused Echocardiography in Emergency Life Support) Course
  • EPALS (European Paediatric Advanced Life Support) Course
  • PILS (Paediatric Immediate Life Support) Course
  • PILS Recertification (Paediatric Immediate Life Support) Course
  • NLS (Newborn Life Support) Course
  • ARNI (Advanced Resuscitation of the Newborn Infant) Course
  • GIC (Generic Instructor Course)
  • ILSi (Immediate Life Support Instructor Course).

ALS: 2 Day Course (Advanced Life Support) Course

Resuscitation Council UK’s two-day ALS course is the perfect way to learn skills in Advanced Life Support. With over 20,000 healthcare professionals trained every year, ALS covers numerous essential skills in resuscitation, including delivery of adult CPR, recognition and management of the deteriorating patient and working in a team during emergency situations.

Our ALS qualification is recognised by the European Resuscitation Council and the Australian Resuscitation Council, giving you the freedom to use your lifesaving skills in other countries.

Who is the course for?

The ALS provider course is designed for healthcare professionals who need skills in Advanced Life Support as part of their clinical duties, as well as those who teach these skills on a regular basis. This includes doctors, paramedics and nurses working in acute care areas (e.g. ED, CCU, ICU, HDU, operating theatres, acute medical admissions units) or on resuscitation/medical emergency/Critical Care Outreach teams.

All applicants must hold a professional healthcare qualification or be in training for a professional healthcare qualification. Medical students in their final year of training can be accepted as Candidates if this is an established local arrangement.

e-ALS (Advanced Life Support) Course

Resuscitation Council UK’s e-ALS course blends a day of e-learning with a day of face-to-face practical learning. With over 20,000 healthcare professionals trained every year, ALS covers numerous essential skills in resuscitation, including delivery of adult CPR, recognition and management of the deteriorating patient and working in a team during emergency situations.

Our ALS qualification is recognised by the European Resuscitation Council and the Australian Resuscitation Council, giving you the freedom to use your lifesaving skills in other countries.

Who is the course for?

The e-ALS course is designed for healthcare professionals who need skills in advanced life support as part of their clinical duties, as well as those who teach these skills on a regular basis. This includes doctors, paramedics and nurses working in acute care areas (e.g. ED, CCU, ICU, HDU, operating theatres, acute medical admissions units) or on resuscitation/ medical emergency/ Critical Care Outreach teams.

All applicants must hold a professional healthcare qualification or be in training for a professional healthcare qualification. Medical students in their final year of training can be accepted as Candidates if this is an established local arrangement.

ALS: Modular (Advanced Life Support) Course

Modular ALS is a special course that offers a timetabled series of modules for special circumstances when a Course Centre cannot provide a full one or two-day face-to-face course.

With over 20,000 healthcare professionals trained every year, ALS covers numerous essential skills in resuscitation, including delivery of adult CPR, recognition and management of the deteriorating patient and working in a team during emergency situations.

Our ALS qualification is recognised by the European Resuscitation Council and the Australian Resuscitation Council, giving you the freedom to use your lifesaving skills in other countries.

Who is the course for?

The ALS provider course is designed for healthcare professionals who need skills in advanced life support as part of their clinical duties, as well as those who teach these skills on a regular basis. This includes doctors, paramedics and nurses working in acute care areas (e.g. ED, CCU, ICU, HDU, operating theatres, acute medical admissions units) or on resuscitation/ medical emergency/ Critical Care Outreach teams.

All applicants must hold a professional healthcare qualification or be in training for a professional healthcare qualification. Medical students in their final year of training can be accepted as candidates if this is an established local arrangement.

ALS: Recertification (Advanced Life Support) Course

A Resuscitation Council UK Advanced Life Support qualification is valid for four years. Recertifying with Resuscitation Council UK is the perfect way to expand upon the skillset developed on an ALS course, ensuring that knowledge is up-to-date and optimised to best practice.

Our ALS qualification is recognised by the European Resuscitation Council and the Australian Resuscitation Council, giving you the freedom to use your lifesaving skills in other countries. With over 20,000 healthcare professionals trained every year, ALS covers numerous essential skills in resuscitation, including delivery of adult CPR, recognition and management of the deteriorating patient and working in a team during emergency situations.

Who is the course for?

ALS recertification courses can only be taken by healthcare professionals who hold a valid Resuscitation Council UK ALS provider certificate, or whose certificate has expired within twelve months of their certificate expiry date. If more than a year has passed since the original certificate expired, the candidate must take a full ALS, e-ALS or modular ALS course.

ILS (Immediate Life Support) Course

Immediate Life Support was developed by Resuscitation Council UK for healthcare professionals who may have to act as the first responder in an emergency, giving them the skills to manage patients in cardiac arrest before a cardiac arrest team arrives.

An ILS course provides a variety of skills, from managing a deteriorating patient, identifying causes and treating cardiac arrest, to improving abilities as both a team member and leader.

Our ILS qualification is recognised by the European Resuscitation Council and the Australian Resuscitation Council, giving you the freedom to use your lifesaving skills in other countries.

Who is the course for?

The ILS course is suitable for doctors, medical students, nurses, nursing students, midwives, paramedics and student paramedics, physiotherapists, dentistry professionals and other health and care professionals. It may also be suitable for fire service technicians, police personnel and prison officers.

e-ILS (Immediate Life Support e-learning) Course

e-ILS is a flexible way of learning skills in Immediate Life Support, and blends e-learning with face-to-face workshops. An e-ILS course provides a variety of skills, from managing a deteriorating patient, identifying causes and treating cardiac arrest, to improving abilities as both a team member and leader.

It’s the ideal training tool for healthcare professionals who may have to act as the first responder in an emergency, giving them the skills to treat patients in cardiac arrest before a supporting team arrives.

Who is the course for?

The e-ILS course is suitable for doctors, medical students, nurses, nursing students, midwives, paramedics and student paramedics, physiotherapists, dentistry professionals and other health and care professionals. It may also be suitable for fire service technicians, police personnel and prison officers.

ILS Recertification (Immediate Life Support) Course

Qualifications in ILS are valid for a year. If your certificate is about to expire, our ILS recertification course is the perfect solution.

This half-day course will refresh your knowledge and skillset in Immediate Life Support, guaranteeing you have the hands-on and teamwork skills needed to manage patients in cardiac emergency before a cardiac arrest team arrives.

Who is the course for?

The ILS course is suitable for doctors, medical students, nurses, nursing students, midwives, paramedics and student paramedics, physiotherapists, dentistry professionals and other health and care professionals. It may also be suitable for fire service technicians, police personnel and prison officers.

FEEL (Focused Echocardiography in Emergency Life Support) Course

FEEL is a specialist course that teaches healthcare professionals skills when using echocardiography and ultrasound in the critically ill patient.

This course trains novice practitioners in the use of transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) during the peri-resuscitation period, an advanced technique that builds from skills learnt on a Resuscitation Council UK ALS course. FEEL is recognised and supported by the British Society of Echocardiography (BSE).

Who is the course for?

The course is intended for healthcare professionals who are involved in the care of the critically ill patient. No prior experience of echocardiography or ultrasound is required for this course. FEEL is intended as an adjunct to Advanced Life Support, and therefore knowledge of the current ALS algorithm is required.

EPALS (European Paediatric Advanced Life Support) Course

EPALS is an advanced course that trains healthcare professionals in the early recognition of the child in respiratory or circulatory failure and management of a cardiac arrest. EPALS provides the knowledge and skills needed to prevent further deterioration and help to save young lives.

The EPALS course is a collaboration between Resuscitation Council UK and the European Resuscitation Council. It is approved by the Royal Colleges of Paediatric and Child Health (RCPCH), Emergency Medicine (RCEM), and Anaesthetics(RCoA), as well as the Association of Paediatric Anaesthetists (APAGBI).

Who is the course for?

The EPALS course is designed for healthcare professionals who need skills in managing deteriorating patients and cardiac arrests. It is for individuals who use skills in advanced paediatric life support as part of their clinical duties, as well as those who teach on a regular basis. This includes doctors, nurses and paramedics.

All applicants must hold a current clinical appointment. They must also hold, or be in training for, a professional healthcare qualification. Medical students in their final year of training can be accepted as Candidates if this is an established local arrangement.

PILS (Paediatric Immediate Life Support) Course

Paediatric Immediate Life Support was developed by Resuscitation Council UK for healthcare professionals who may have to manage and treat paediatric patients in an emergency.

PILS provides a variety of skills, from managing a deteriorating patient, identifying causes of deterioration and treating cardiac arrest in children, to developing team leadership abilities and finding out what it takes to be an effective team member in a cardiac arrest emergency.

A PILS qualification is recognised across the UK and Europe, allowing healthcare professionals to save young lives in many parts of the world.

Who is the course for?

The PILS Course is appropriate for a range of Candidates including doctors, nurses, paramedics, ODPs, health visitors, school nurses, midwives, cardiac technicians, resuscitation officers, physiotherapists, dentistry professionals, ambulance technicians and medical and nursing students.

PILS Recertification (Paediatric Immediate Life Support) Course

A PILS qualification is valid for one year. If your certificate is about to expire, our PILS recertification course is the perfect solution.

This half-day course will refresh your knowledge and skill-set in Paediatric Immediate Life Support, guaranteeing you have the hands-on and teamwork skills needed to manage children and infants in emergency situations.

Who is the course for?

The PILS Course is appropriate for a range of Candidates including doctors, nurses, paramedics, ODPs, health visitors, school nurses, midwives, cardiac technicians, resuscitation officers, physiotherapists, dentistry professionals, ambulance technicians and medical and nursing students.

NLS (Newborn Life Support) Course

Focussing specifically on the resuscitation of the newborn infant, NLS teaches healthcare professionals the essential practical skills and theoretical knowledge needed to best aid the newborn infant in an emergency.

Over 6,000 healthcare professionals take our NLS course every year. It is a must for all healthcare professionals who are involved in the delivery and care of the newborn.
Who is the course for?

The NLS course is designed for any healthcare professional involved in the delivery and care of the newborn infant. This includes both junior and senior medical and nursing staff, midwives, paramedics and resuscitation officers.

All applicants must hold a professional healthcare qualification or be in training for a professional healthcare qualification.

Unlike many of our other courses, there is no NLS recertification course. The NLS course is appropriate for first-time Candidates as well as those looking to renew their NLS certification.

ARNI (Advanced Resuscitation of the Newborn Infant) Course

ARNI is a nationally recognised, specialist course that teaches a systematic approach to the rapid assessment and initial management of the newborn with worrying or life-threatening signs.

Developed with support from the baby charity Bliss, ARNI is proven to increase confidence in technical and non-technical skills in advanced resuscitation of the newborn infant.

Who is the course for?

The ARNI course is designed for healthcare professionals involved in the delivery and care of newborn infants in a role more advanced than that of first responder. Candidates must hold a current Resuscitation Council UK NLS provider certificate and should be involved in care of the pre-term and sick newborn infants.

Candidates will mainly be medical staff at ST3 level and above (in or about to commence a 2nd tier role), neonatal nurses with a qualification in the specialty or Advanced Neonatal Nurse Practitioners. The ARNI course will also be appropriate for others such as experienced paramedics working with newborn transfer teams, resuscitation officers with a significant regular newborn workload and anaesthetists with a newborn or PICU practice.

This course is for people who are taking an ARNI course for the first time, as well as those who are looking to recertify.

GIC (Generic Instructor Course)

The Generic Instructor Course trains future Instructors in the principles of adult learning. These skills can then be used to teach fellow healthcare professionals at a number of our courses, including ALS, EPALS and NLS.

This course is a joint collaboration between Resuscitation Council UK and the Advanced Life Support Group (ALSG). Around 900 Instructors are trained on this course every year.

ILSi (Immediate Life Support Instructor Course)

ILSi is a specialist Instructor course that gives Candidates the skills to become an Instructor in Immediate Life Support (ILS) and Paediatric Immediate Life Support (PILS). These skills can then be used to teach fellow healthcare professionals at ILS and PILS courses.

What does resuscitation mean?

transitive verb. : to revive from apparent death or from unconsciousness also: revitalize. intransitive verb. : come to, revive.

What are the types of resuscitation?

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR):

Electric shocks (referred to as defibrillation) and drugs (also known as inotropes and vasopressors) can also be used to stimulate the heart.

Defibrillation: Defibrillation involves sending a powerful electric shock through the heart.

What is the difference between CPR and resuscitation?

CPR or Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation is an emergency lifesaving procedure performed when the heart stops beating. Immediate CPR can double or triple the chances of survival after cardiac arrest.

What is hospital resuscitation?

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) consists of the use of chest compressions and artificial ventilation to maintain circulatory flow and oxygenation during cardiac arrest (see the images below).

What happens during resuscitation?

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) combines rescue breathing (mouth-to-mouth) and chest compressions to temporarily pump enough blood to the brain until specialised treatment is available. Chest compressions are the priority in CPR.

How long can you resuscitate someone?

Doctors have long believed that if someone is without a heartbeat for longer than about 20 minutes, the brain usually suffers irreparable damage. But this can be avoided, Parnia says, with good quality CPR and careful post-resuscitation care.

What is the aim of resuscitation?

Its main purpose is to restore the partial flow of oxygenated blood to the brain and heart. The objective is to delay tissue death and to extend the brief window of opportunity for a successful resuscitation without permanent brain damage.

What drugs are used in resuscitation?

The drugs used during cardiac arrest response include:

  • Adrenaline
  • Amiodarone
  • Lidocaine
  • Atropine
  • Additional drugs
  • Calcium chloride
  • Magnesium sulphate
  • Miscellaneous drugs.

Does resuscitation hurt?

Studies have shown that there is almost no chance that you will hurt the person. While it is rare that a rib will be broken during CPR, doctors are able to repair broken ribs, but they cannot repair death.

When do you use mouth to mouth resuscitation?

It is used on a patient with a beating heart or as part of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to achieve internal respiration.

What is mechanical resuscitation?

Mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation (mCPR) devices provide automated chest compressions to sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) victims. These devices are designed to achieve the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), just like manual CPR.

How long do you do CPR before calling the time of death?

This recommendation has led to many departments implementing rules for termination of resuscitation that include providing at least 20 minutes of on-scene CPR.

Who decides Do Not Resuscitate (DNACPR)?

DNACPR is a medical treatment decision that can be made by your doctor even if you do not agree. You must be told that a DNACPR form will be/has been completed for you, but a doctor does not need your consent.

Why choose Do Not Resuscitate?

A do not resuscitate order (DNR) is a legally binding order signed by a physician at a patient's request. Its purpose is to let medical professionals know you do not want to be resuscitated if you suddenly go into cardiac arrest or stop breathing. This is a common concern of the chronically ill and the elderly.

Does resuscitation cause brain damage?

Brain injury can occur after cardiac arrest due to the effects of ischaemia and reperfusion. In serious cases this can lead to permanent disability. This risk must be considered when making decisions about terminating resuscitation.

What is emergency resuscitation?

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an organized, sequential response to cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest stops blood from flowing to vital organs, depriving them of... read more , including. Recognition of absent breathing and circulation. Basic life support with chest compressions and rescue breathing.

How long does it take to recover from resuscitation?

It may imply that recovery may take more than 6 months, but also that the outcome quality of life after CPR depends on the timing of assessment.

What is the cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidance in the UK?

Resuscitation Council UK’s Guidelines guarantee that health and care professionals across the UK share the same knowledge base surrounding teamwork and practice.

The 2021 Guidelines contain detailed information about basic and advanced life support for adults, paediatrics and newborns, as well as information on the use of Automated External Defibrillators and other topics.

The most recent set of RCUK guidelines was released in 2021. They were distilled from the 2021 ERC Guidelines and tailored to clinical practice in the UK. The process used to produce the Resuscitation Council UK Guidelines 2021 is accredited by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE).

What is the current policy guidance for resuscitation training?

The expert organisation for cardiopulmonary resuscitation is the Resuscitation Council UK (RCUK).

What is the relevant expert guidance for resuscitation training in the UK?

The expert guidance for resuscitation training in the UK includes:

  • Resuscitation Council (2013-2017), Quality standards for cardiopulmonary resuscitation practice and training
  • Resuscitation Council (2021), Resuscitation Guidelines
  • British Medical Association, Resuscitation Council (UK) and the Royal College of Nursing (2015), Decisions relating to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (June 2016)
  • General Medical Council (2010), Treatment and care towards the end of life: good practice in decision making.

Who is the target audience for cardiopulmonary resuscitation training?

Learning outcomes for resuscitation courses are divided into three levels based on knowledge, skills and understanding. The appropriate level of resuscitation training is dependent upon an individual’s role, work context and a local risk assessment.

Where do the resuscitation training outcomes come from?

The resuscitation training learning outcomes are derived from the Resuscitation Council (2015) Resuscitation Guidelines.

What do the resuscitation training levels mean?

The levels given here are for the majority of staff who might need to be involved in delivering CPR. However, there are additional specialist levels of outcomes that need to be achieved for those who are expected to lead a resuscitation team, are resuscitation team members or teach resuscitation. These specialist outcomes for ‘Advanced Life Support’ are not covered in this framework.

Where can I find further information about specialist resuscitation outcomes?

For further information about specialist outcomes, please see the Resuscitation Council (2015) Resuscitation Guidelines and the Quality Standards for Clinical Practice and Training.

Where staff are exposed to and involved in the care of patients from a range of age groups, they should receive the relevant type of resuscitation training.

Who is resuscitation Level 1 training for?

Level 1 resuscitation training is for non-clinical staff, dependent upon local risk assessment or work context.

Who is resuscitation Level 2 (Basic Life Support) training for?

Level 2 resuscitation (basic life support) is for staff with direct clinical care responsibilities including all qualified healthcare professionals:

  • Staff working with Adult patients should undertake training in adult basic life support.
  • Staff working with Paediatric patients should undertake training in paediatric basic life support.
  • Staff working with Newborn patients should undertake training in newborn basic life support.

Who is Level 3 resuscitation (Immediate Life Support) for?

Immediate life support (ILS) Level 3 is for staff with direct clinical care responsibilities including all qualified healthcare professionals:

  • Registered healthcare professionals with a responsibility to participate as part of the adult resuscitation team should undertake adult immediate life support training.
  • Registered healthcare professionals with a responsibility to participate as part of the paediatric resuscitation team should undertake paediatric immediate life support training.
  • Registered healthcare professionals with a responsibility to participate as part of the newborn resuscitation team should undertake newborn life support training.
  • Registered healthcare professionals involved in administering rapid tranquillisation in the care of patients with disturbed mental functioning should undertake adult immediate life support training.
  • Registered healthcare professionals involved in administering sedation in the care of dental or podiatric patients should undertake adult immediate life support training and, where appropriate to caseload, paediatric immediate life support training.

What are the key resuscitation training learning outcomes?

The key learning outcomes for resuscitation training are developed by Resuscitation UK (RCUK). See below the learning outcomes for all the resuscitation training courses.

What are the learning outcomes for Level 1 resuscitation training?

On completion of the resuscitation Level 1 course, the learner will:

  • be able to recognise cardiorespiratory arrest
  • know how to summon immediate emergency help in accordance with local protocols
  • be able to start CPR using chest compressions
  • be able to locate and operate an AED.

What are the learning outcomes of the Level 2 resuscitation (Adult Basic Life Support) training course?

The learning outcomes of the Level 2 basic life support (BLS) include the Level 1 learning outcomes plus the ones outlined below.

On completion of the basic life support (resuscitation Level 2), the learner will:

  • understand national guidelines and local resuscitation policies and procedures
  • know how to recognise and respond to patients with clinical deterioration or cardiorespiratory arrest, escalating care in accordance with local policy
  • be able to initiate an appropriate emergency response, which may include management of choking, and the use of the recovery position, all in accordance with current Resuscitation Council UK guidelines
  • be able to initiate and maintain effective chest compressions in accordance with current Resuscitation Council UK guidelines
  • be able to provide basic airway management i.e. ensure an open airway
  • be able to initiate and maintain effective lung ventilation in accordance with current Resuscitation Council UK (RCUK) guidelines
  • know how an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) can be operated safely and appropriately
  • understand their individual role and responsibilities in responding to persons in emergency situations
  • understand their individual responsibilities in reporting and recording details of an emergency event accurately
  • understand the importance of undertaking any resuscitation interventions within the limits of their personal capabilities and context of any previous training received
  • know how they should apply the local Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) Policy/anticipatory care decision within the clinical context.

What are the learning outcomes of the Level 2 resuscitation (Newborn Basic Life Support) training course?

The learning outcomes of the Level 2 Newborn Basic Life Support include the Level 1 learning outcomes plus the ones outlined below.

On completion of the Newborn Basic Life Support (newborn resuscitation Level 2), the learner will:

  • understand national guidelines and local Resuscitation policies and procedures
  • know how to recognise and respond to a newborn infant, escalating care in accordance with local policy
  • understand the importance of temperature control in the care of the newborn
  • be able to initiate an appropriate emergency response in accordance with current Resuscitation Council UK guidelines
  • be able to provide basic airway management i.e. ensure an open airway
  • be able to initiate and maintain effective respiration in accordance with current Resuscitation Council UK guidelines
  • be able to initiate and maintain effective chest compressions in accordance with current Resuscitation Council UK guidelines
  • understand their individual role and responsibilities in responding to persons in emergency situations 
  • understand their individual responsibilities in reporting and recording details of an emergency event accurately
  • understand the importance of undertaking any resuscitation interventions within the limits of their personal capabilities and context of any previous training received.

What are the learning outcomes of the Level 2 resuscitation (Paediatric Basic Life Support) training course?

The learning outcomes of the Level 2 Paediatric Basic Life Support include the Level 1 learning outcomes plus the ones outlined below.

On completion of the Paediatric Basic Life Support (paediatric resuscitation Level 2), the learner will:

  • understand national guidelines and local Resuscitation policies and procedures
  • know how to recognise and respond to patients with clinical deterioration or cardiorespiratory arrest, escalating care in accordance with local policy
  • be able to initiate an appropriate emergency response, which may include management of choking and the use of the recovery position, in accordance with current Resuscitation Council UK guidelines
  • be able to provide basic airway management i.e. ensure an open airway
  • be able to initiate and maintain effective lung ventilation in accordance with current Resuscitation Council UK guidelines
  • be able to initiate and maintain effective chest compressions in accordance with current Resuscitation Council UK guidelines
  • understand their individual role and responsibilities in responding to persons in emergency situations
  • understand their individual responsibilities in reporting and recording details of an emergency event accurately
  • understand the importance of undertaking any resuscitation interventions within the limits of their personal capabilities and context of any previous training received
  • know how they should apply the local Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Policy / anticipatory care decision within the clinical context.

What are the learning outcomes of the Level 3 resuscitation (Adult Immediate Life Support) training course?

The learning outcomes of the Level 3 Adult Immediate Life Support (ILS) include the Levels 1&2 learning outcomes plus the ones outlined below.

On completion of the Adult Immediate Life Support (resuscitation Level 3), the learner will:

  • be able to recognise the seriously ill adult and initiate appropriate interventions to prevent cardiorespiratory arrest
  • understand and be able to apply the ABCDE approach
  • know how to manage and co-ordinate roles and responsibilities within the team in responding to emergency situations until the arrival of a resuscitation team or more experienced assistance
  • be able to participate as a member of the resuscitation team
  • be able to provide initial post resuscitation care until the arrival of the resuscitation team or more experienced assistance.

What are the learning outcomes of the Level 3 resuscitation (Newborn Immediate Life Support) training course?

The learning outcomes of the Level 3 Newborn Immediate Life Support include the Levels 1&2 learning outcomes plus the ones outlined below.

On completion of the Newborn Immediate Life Support (resuscitation Level 3), the learner will:

  • be able to recognise the seriously ill newborn and initiate appropriate interventions to prevent cardiorespiratory arrest.
  • understand the importance of maintaining newborn temperature control
  • know how to manage and co-ordinate roles and responsibilities within the team in responding to emergency situations until the arrival of a resuscitation team or more experienced assistance
  • be able to participate as a member of the resuscitation team
  • be able to provide initial post resuscitation care until the arrival of the resuscitation team or more experienced assistance.

What are the learning outcomes of the Level 3 resuscitation (Paediatric Immediate Life Support) training course?

The learning outcomes of the Level 3 Paediatric Immediate Life Support include the Levels 1&2 learning outcomes plus the ones outlined below.

On completion of the Paediatric Immediate Life Support (resuscitation Level 3), the learner will:

  • be able to recognise the seriously ill child and initiate appropriate interventions to prevent cardiorespiratory arrest
  • understand and be able to apply the ABCDE approach
  • know how to manage and co-ordinate roles and responsibilities within the team in responding to emergency situations until the arrival of a resuscitation team or more experienced assistance
  • be able to participate as a member of the resuscitation team
  • be able to provide initial post resuscitation care until the arrival of the resuscitation team or more experienced assistance.

Who is the ILS provider course for?

The immediate life support (ILS) provider course is an ideal training solution for doctors, dentists, nurses, locums, GP's, podiatry & reflexology staff, care home employees, domiciliary carers. This course is easy to complete and holds a level 3 resuscitation training certification.

Who is advanced life support (ALS) training for?

The advanced life support (ALS) provider course is designed for healthcare professionals who need skills in Advanced Life Support as part of their clinical duties, as well as those who teach these skills on a regular basis.

What is ALS course?

The ALS course aims to train candidates to identify the causes of cardiac arrest, recognise patients in danger of deterioration, and manage both the cardiac arrest and the 'peri-arrest' problems encountered in the first hour or so after initial resuscitation from a cardiac arrest.

How long does ALS course last?

The ALS Provider certificate is valid for four years. Providers may recertify in two ways, either by undertaking a full ALS provider course successfully or attending the ALS recertification course successfully.

Why ALS course is important?

The ALS course teaches the knowledge and skills required to: recognize and treat the deteriorating patient using a structured ABCDE approach; deliver standardized CPR in adults; ... utilize non-technical skills to facilitate strong team leadership and effective team membership.

What is the difference between ALS and ILS?

The ILS course addresses the needs of staff who need more advanced skills than those taught during basic life support (BLS), but who do not require the more comprehensive Advanced Life Support (ALS) course.

Do I need BLS if I have ALS?

ALS means Advanced Life Support and BLS means Basic life Support. An ALS can give basic treatment in case of cuts or injuries whereas a BLS person does not have the right to do it. Unlike the BLS unit, an ALS unit will be equipped with airway equipment, cardiac life support, cardiac monitors and glucose testing device.

Can I do ALS without ILS?

Prerequisite for BLS/ILS For candidates who are currently working in the UK an essential prerequisite to attending the course is proof of face-to-face BLS or ILS certification in the last 12 months.

How often should you train for ALS?

How long do I have to recertify? ALS, ARNI, EPALS, NLS, ILS, PILS qualifications: You have one year from the expiry date of your course certificate, which you can recertify your qualification.

How often do you have to do ALS?

It is generally expected that most doctors attend an ALS course at least once every 4 years. Your hospital may provide this for you, or you may have to arrange (and pay!) for this yourself.

Can you fail advanced life support?

Unfortunately, some ALS candidates fail to achieve their ALS certification. Failure rates in the cardiac arrest scenario test (CASTest) at the end of the ALS course may be as high as 60% [4]. Until now, no specific investigation has been conducted to identify factors associated with ALS course outcome.

How many CPD hours is ALS?

The ALS course is recognised for up to 10 continuing professional development (CPD) points. The course manual is sent to candidates one month before the course.

What is the required frequency of refresher training or assessment for resuscitation courses?

Resuscitation refresher training should take place as follows:

  • Resuscitation Level 1 – every year.
  • Resuscitation Level 2 – every year.
  • Resuscitation Level 3 – every year.

What are the organisational Implications for resuscitation training?

Each healthcare organisation must ensure awareness of local procedures and that the required training schedule is incorporated into their local policy.

Do all healthcare providers have to carry out resuscitation training audits?

Organisations should have a programme of resuscitation audit in place. The outcomes and implications of audits should be used to ensure that key policies and practices are being implemented appropriately and that they inform training priorities in order to improve practice.

What is the importance of resuscitation refresher training?

Refresher training is aimed at ensuring maintenance of knowledge and skills and, dependent upon the role, clinical responsibilities and context. Some staff groups may need more frequent refresher training.

Is there additional resuscitation training for healthcare professionals?

Additional training will be indicated for all staff if there is a change in Resuscitation guidelines nationally or where the organisation has amended its policy locally. Local action plans developed with the involvement of the lead advisor should determine the best way of achieving any training requirements necessitated by changes in guidelines.

What is the best way to deliver resuscitation training courses?

A variety of training methods and approaches may be used to plan and deliver flexibly any required refresher training. Refresher training does not mean that staff have to undertake classroom-based training only. Any training methods used must be relevant for promoting the maintenance of knowledge and skills and their effectiveness must be monitored.

What is the best way to assess competence for resuscitation courses?

  • Where a staff member or learner can demonstrate the required level of current knowledge, understanding and practice through robust pre-assessment, including where relevant practical assessment, this can be used as evidence that knowledge and skills have been maintained, and the staff member may not need to undertake refresher training.
  • Where a staff member or learner does not meet the required level of current knowledge, understanding and practice through pre-assessment they should complete the refresher training and any associated assessments required.
  • Those individuals who maintain their instructor status on a life support course should be deemed to have the required knowledge, understanding and skills and do not need to undertake refresher training in the speciality concerned.

What are the standards for resuscitation training delivery?

The Resuscitation Council UK has set out recommendations for the planning, organisation and delivery of resuscitation training and these should be used as a key reference point. This includes guidance on suggested training methods:

“For all staff, a variety of methods to acquire, maintain and assess resuscitation skills and knowledge can be used for annual updates (e.g. life support courses, simulation training, in-house training, mock-drills, ‘rolling refreshers’, elearning, video based training/self-instruction). The appropriate methods must be determined locally… ‘Hands-on’ simulation training and assessment is recommended for clinical staff”

(Resuscitation Council 2014-15, Quality standards for cardiopulmonary resuscitation practice and training)"

How do organisations meet the minimum resuscitation training standards?

In ensuring minimum training standards, the employing organisation should be assured that those learning facilitators that are involved in the delivery of Resuscitation education or training have the appropriate qualifications,
experience or background to deliver training to a satisfactory standard. This may include the following:

  • A relevant professional and/or healthcare qualification and/or experience, for example, a Resuscitation Officer.
  • Completion of specific training for cardiopulmonary arrests in special circumstances related to the clinical setting in which they deliver training e.g. paediatrics, newborn, pregnancy and trauma
  • Demonstration of up to date competences in Resuscitation relevant to the level of practice and teaching.
  • A thorough knowledge of Resuscitation issues and procedures and an understanding of their application and practice within a healthcare setting.
  • Experience of teaching and learning, including the ability to meet the competences expected for LSILADD04.

How can resuscitation training providers plan and prepare specific learning and development opportunities?

Learning facilitators must have access to equipment for resuscitation training, including as appropriate adult and paediatric manikins, airway management trainers, ECG monitors, rhythm simulators and defibrillators.

What is basic life support?

Basic Life Support, or BLS, generally refers to the type of care that first-responders, healthcare providers and public safety professionals provide to anyone who is experiencing cardiac arrest, respiratory distress or an obstructed airway.

What is ILS in resuscitation?

Immediate Life Support was developed by Resuscitation Council UK for healthcare professionals who may have to act as the first responder in an emergency, giving them the skills to manage patients in cardiac arrest before a cardiac arrest team arrives.

Is ALS better than BLS?

ALS seems to improve survival in patients with myocardial infarction and BLS seems to be the proper level of care for patients with penetrating injuries. Some studies indicate a beneficial effect of ALS among patients with blunt head injuries or multiple injuries.

Is CPR BLS or ALS?

There are two types of life support: advanced and basic.

BLS is performed without drugs and only includes cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and the use of an Automated External Defibrillator (AED). BLS is intended for lay responders and includes topics such as performing CPR.

Does ALS include CPR?

ALS certificates will be accepted as evidence of BLS only if the course includes basic life support including assessment in CPR. Acceptable ALS courses must include management of adults, and must not be paediatric only.

What do you mean by basic life support?

Basic Life Support, or BLS, generally refers to the type of care that first-responders, healthcare providers and public safety professionals provide to anyone who is experiencing cardiac arrest, respiratory distress or an obstructed airway.

Is basic life support the same as CPR?

Basic life support courses are typically more in-depth and complex and are based on working in teams with other professional rescuers in the medical field, whereas CPR training teaches you the essentials about performing the CPR technique on a family member or co-worker as a single rescuer.

What is the main purpose of basic life support?

Basic life support consists of a number of medical procedures provided to patients with life-threatening conditions of the body, that cause pain or dysfunction to the person. All these techniques are focused on helping patients or sustain life until more precise medical treatment can begin.

What are the 4 main elements of basic life support?

The key elements include:

  • Prompt recognition of cardiac arrest
  • Call for urgent medical assistance
  • Early effective CPR with an emphasis on minimal disruptions to compressions
  • Early defibrillation
  • Early advanced life support
  • Integrated post-cardiac arrest care.

Does BLS certification cover first aid?

While some of the training does overlap with First Aid, like the initial scene size up and patient assessment, the BLS Certification Course does not generally cover First Aid training specifically.

How do you do cardiopulmonary resuscitation?

Due to the current coronavirus outbreak, there are several important changes to CPR advised by the Resuscitation Council UK. If you find someone unconscious follow these simple steps:

  • Shake the person gently and shout for help.
  • Call 999.
  • Don't put your face close to theirs. If you think there's risk of infection, use a towel or a piece of clothing and lay it over their mouth and nose.
  • Give chest compressions only - do not give rescue breaths.
  • Continue until an ambulance arrives.
  • After the ambulance crew have taken over wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water or use an alcohol based hand gel.

How do you do CPR in 5 steps?

Follow the 5 steps below to deliver effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Step 1: Shake and shout

  • If you come across someone who is unconscious, always check for danger and look for risks before you start helping.
  • Someone having a cardiac arrest will either not be breathing or they won’t be breathing normally. They also won’t be conscious.
  • Check for a response – gently shake the person’s shoulders and ask loudly 'are you alright?'
  • Shout for help – if someone is nearby, ask them to stay as you might need them. If you are alone, shout loudly to attract attention, but don't leave the person.

Step 2: Call 999

If the person is not breathing or not breathing normally:

  • ask someone to call 999 immediately and ask for an ambulance
  • ask someone for a public access defibrillator (PAD).
  • If there's no one around call 999 before starting compressions.

Step 3: Cover mouth and nose with cloth

  • If you think there's a risk of infection, lay a towel or a piece of clothing over the mouth and nose. Don't put your face close to theirs.
  • If you're sure the person is breathing normally, then put them in the recovery position.

Step 4: Give chest compressions

  • Do not give rescue breaths at this time.
  • Kneel next to the person.
  • Place the heel of one hand in the centre of their chest. Place your other hand on top of the first. Interlock your fingers.
  • With straight arms, use the heel of your hand to push the breastbone down firmly and smoothly, so that the chest is pressed down between 5–6 cm, and release.
  • Do this at a rate of 100 to 120 chest compressions per minute – that’s around 2 per second.

Step 5: Keep going

  • Keep going until professional help arrives and takes over, or the person starts to show signs of regaining consciousness, such as coughing, opening their eyes, speaking, or breathing normally.
  • If you’re feeling tired, and there’s someone nearby to help, instruct them to continue.
  • If you’re the person giving CPR to someone it can be a traumatic event, even if they survive.

Why complete your cardiopulmonary resuscitation training with The Mandatory Training Group?

The Mandatory Training Group is the leading provider of accredited cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training courses, including:

  • Basic Life Support Training Courses
  • CPR & AED Training Courses
  • Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
  • Basic Life Support Training Courses
  • CPR + AED Refresher Courses
  • BLS Refresher Training Courses.

Contact our Coventry based Support Team on 024 7610 0090 or via Email to discuss how we can help your organisation with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training courses for your organisation.

Resuscitation Courses, Training & Qualifications - Online CPR + BLS & AED Training Courses - The Mandatory Training Group UK -

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