Healthcare Clinics Mandatory Training - CSTF Aligned E-Learning Courses

Healthcare Clinics Mandatory Training - CSTF Aligned E-Learning Courses

Healthcare Clinics Mandatory Training - CSTF Aligned E-Learning Courses

Mandatory Training Requirements Clinical Staff

For the purposes of this document, ‘clinical’ refers to staff that have regular, clinical contact with patients. This includes medical staff; nursing and midwifery staff; allied health professionals such as occupational therapists, physiotherapists speech and language therapists, radiographers; healthcare scientists; biomedical scientists; additional professional, scientific and technical staff such as operating department practitioners, pharmacists, optometrists, clinical psychologists, clinical technicians; additional clinical services staff such as healthcare assistants, assistant practitioners, dental surgery assistants, medical laboratory assistants, phlebotomists, porters working in patient areas. Core risk management training for staff has been identified to meet legislative and statutory requirements as well as Health and Patient Safety standards such as those defined by the NHS Litigation Authority (NHSLA) and the Care Quality Commission (CQC). Training is defined as mandatory if it meets one or more of the following criteria: It is a statutory requirement All staff across the organisation require the training It is a NHSLA or CQC requirement This document identifies the minimum mandatory training requirements of the organisation for clinical staff. There may be other additional training required by particular staff groups. This training will be identified through Local Induction and/or Staff Development Review/Appraisal. If you are unsure as to what additional training is required, speak to your line manager or training link. To view more detailed training requirements set out by staff group and to find out how to access training, please click here and you will be directed to the Mandatory Training Prospectus.

Mandatory Training Courses for Nurses and NHS Care Staff

The Skills Platform lists a wide range of mandatory training courses which are suitable for NHS workers such as nurses, doctors and dentists. These training courses are also beneficial to care staff working in the social care setting such as a CQC registered care home or domiciliary care agency.

We often get asked “What is the difference between mandatory and statutory training?” - Mandatory training differs from statutory training as they are usually made compulsory by the organisation to ensure their employees are competent to reduce risks, follow guidelines and comply with their policies. Statutory training is required by law or a statutory body such as the Care Quality Commission has instructed the organisation to carry the training to meet legislative requirements. Read our in-depth article for more details.

Organisations such as the General Medical Council (GMC) and the Nursing & Midwifery Council (NMC) are the regulators in the healthcare sector for doctors and nurses. The Royal College of Nursing (RCN) has provided guidance on the differences between mandatory and statutory training. Mandatory training requirements may vary depending on the job role and specific responsibilities of the employee.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) can take regulatory action if health and social care providers do not meet the Regulation 18requirements. It states that staff must receive support, training and personal development necessary for them to carry out their job role. Employees that have completed mandatory training course previously should undertake annual updates or refresher training to ensure they have the knowledge and understanding of changes in legislation and directives. Annual refresher training intervals will vary depending on the organisational requirements.

Skills for Health have created the Core Skills Training Framework (CSTF) for healthcare employers which provides guidance, mapping tools and learning outcomes to improve quality, reduce costs, track progress, consistency and standardisation of training.

Mandatory training can be delivered to a group in a classroom environment such as a training centre by an experienced trainer which will cover both the theory and practical elements. Alternatively, you can purchase an online eLearning bundle which starts from around £50 per person, this would be suitable for individuals that need to learn the theory elements. You should always assess your employees including their training needs, learning styles and identify skills gaps which will help you choose the most suitable delivery method.

In most cases these courses provide an all in one solution, providing an overview of all the core essentials such as health and safety,, safeguarding training, equality and diversity, moving & handling, fire safety and conflict resolution.

Helping you meet your training obligations

There are so many different and conflicting demands on GP practices in England, from commissioners or practice inspectors, to undertake mandatory training that it can be hard to know what's what.

In some instances, what is described as mandatory or statutory training may not actually be the case.

To help you take control and make informed decisions that are best for your staff and best for your practice, see our new guidance below.

Please note

This list is not exhaustive and will be added to as and when new information is received.

If you receive notification that training in a particular area (or a specific training course) is required, get in touch with BMA staff who will be happy to clarify your training obligations.

https://www.bma.org.uk/advice/employment/gp-practices/gps-and-staff/practice-staff-training-resource

Mandatory Training for Practice Staff

There are no statutory regulations that specify how often primary care staff  should be trained. Fundamentally, it is important that if anything untoward happened in your practice, the Partners could stand in front of a coroner or judge and justify that the training they had provided for their staff was sufficient to ensure they were competent, and confident to undertake the task given to them.

It would be wise to check guidance from:

  • GMC
  • CQC
  • Health and Safety Executive
  • Resuscitation Council
  • Enhanced Services Specifications

to see if they are making specific training recommendations.

‘Mandatory’ means that specified training is compulsory at the discretion of the employer, however there are many other examples of good practice in training that you may wish to follow to keep all staff up to date.

Mandatory training differs for Staff/Managers and Practice Nurses but is basically as follows and Wessex LMCs recommends:

  • Induction: once (within first month of employment)
  • Fire Safety: annually
  • Manual Handling: once then refreshed when necessary
  • Infection Control: annually
  • CPR/Basic Life Support: annually
  • Safeguarding (adults and children): e-learning is acceptable. Please see our safeguarding section for more info on this and our Lunch and Learn (Level 1) training resource.
  • Information Governance: Once, then refreshed when necessary. You may wish to use our Lunch and Learn for this for the whole practice.
  • Conflict Resolution: 3 yearly refresher. You may wish to use our Lunch and Learn training resources for this. We have one on Customer Service Skills https://www.wessexlmcs.com/lunchandlearn/view/11 and one on Understanding Conflict https://www.wessexlmcs.com/lunchandlearn/view/12

  • Equality and Diversity: once with refresher if required. Once again we have written a Lunch and Learn to cover this topic
  • Mental Capacity Act: once with refresher if required. We also have written a Lunch and Learn training resource to support this https://www.wessexlmcs.com/lunchandlearn/view/13

For team leaders or managers of staff or appointed leads it is also recommended that the following are covered at least once:

  • Managing Performance
  • Recruitment and Selection
  • Appraisal training
  • Managing sickness and absence
  • Risk assessment
  • Health and Safety

For any information on local training courses to cover any of the above, please do not hesitate to contact Louise Greenwood on louise.greenwood@wessexlmcs.org.uk

Free e-learning can be accessed at http://portal.e-lfh.org.uk/Account/logon

Nigel's surgery 70: Mandatory training considerations in general practice

Categories:
  • Organisations we regulate

We are often asked whether we set out mandatory training requirements for GP practices.

CQC does not have a list of mandatory training for members of the GP practice team. This is because exact training requirements will depend on the role and specific responsibilities of practices and the needs of the people using the service. Ultimately the practice is responsible for determining what mandatory, and additional, training staff need to meet the needs of their patients.

We look at staff training under our key question of how effective a provider is. Key line of enquiry (KLOE) E3 specifically considers whether “staff have the skills, knowledge and experience to deliver effective care and treatment”. All providers are required, under the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014 to meet Regulation 18. Providers must have sufficient numbers of suitably qualified, competent, skilled and experienced staff to meet the needs of the people using the service at all times.

During an inspection our team will look at whether staff have the right qualifications, skills, knowledge and experience to do their job:

  • when they start their employment
  • when they take on new responsibilities
  • on an ongoing basis.

We look at how the provider identifies the learning needs of staff; and whether they have appropriate training to meet their learning needs and to cover the scope of their work.

As we have said, we do not have a definitive list of mandatory training. However, these are examples of training that we would expect to see evidence of:

Providers could be asked to demonstrate training for clinical staff linked to their specific clinical responsibilities. For nursing staff, for example, this could be taking samples for the cervical screening programme, administering vaccines and for extended roles in treating minor illness and long-term conditions.

Mandatory training for practice staff: the lowdown

A topic that we’re often asked about is mandatory training for members of the GP practice team – and more specifically, what the CQC expects to happen in practices.

The topic is actually one that’s addressed in the excellent CQC mythbuster series – available on the CQC website. This handy guidance outlines exactly what inspectors are looking for when they call – and provides an excellent benchmark for practice managers to work towards.

What’s mandatory?

In a nutshell, the CQC does not have a list of mandatory training for members of the GP practice team. This, it says, is because exact training requirements will depend on the role and specific responsibilities of practices and the needs of the people using the service.

That means practices are ultimately responsible for determining what mandatory, and additional, training staff need to meet the needs of their patients.

More specifically…

That’s all a little woolly, so where can practices turn for further guidance?

The CQC says that when it is looking at staff training under its key question of how effective a provider is, key line of enquiry (KLOE) E3 specifically considers whether “staff have the skills, knowledge and experience to deliver effective care and treatment”. All providers are required, under the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014, to meet Regulation 18.

That means providers must have sufficient numbers of suitably qualified, competent, skilled and experienced staff to meet the needs of the people using the service at all times.

During an inspection, the CQC team will look at whether staff have the right qualifications, skills, knowledge and experience to do their job. This includes:

  • when they start their employment
  • when they take on new responsibilities
  • on an ongoing basis

Inspectors will look at how the provider identifies the learning needs of staff; and whether they have appropriate training to meet their learning needs and to cover the scope of their work.

Some examples

While there isn’t a definitive list of mandatory training, the CQC has issued a list of training examples that it expects to see evidence of. This includes:

Practices could be asked to demonstrate training for clinical staff linked to their specific clinical responsibilities. For nursing staff, for example, this could be taking samples for the cervical screening programme, administering vaccines and for extended roles in treating minor illness and long-term conditions.

Further guidance

As discussed earlier, there are no statutory regulations that specify how often primary care staff should be trained. Fundamentally, it is important that if anything untoward happened in your practice, partners could stand in front of a coroner or judge and justify that the training they had provided for their staff was sufficient to ensure they were competent, and confident to undertake the task given to them.

Wessex LMC adds that it would be wise to check guidance from the following to see if they are making specific training recommendations:

  • GMC
  • CQC
  • Health and Safety Executive
  • Resuscitation Council
  • Enhanced Services Specifications

An example

In the informative briefing note issued by Wessex LMC, a sample training plan is outlined, which is as follows:

  • Induction: once (within first month of employment)
  • Fire safety: annually
  • Manual handling: once then refreshed when necessary
  • Infection control: annually
  • CPR/basic life support: annually
  • Safeguarding (adults and children): e-learning is acceptable
  • Information governance: Once, then refreshed when necessary
  • Conflict resolution: Three yearly refresher
  • Equality and diversity: Once with refresher if required
  • Mental Capacity Act: Once with refresher if required

For team leaders or managers of staff or appointed leads, the LMC also recommends that the following are covered at least once:

  • Managing performance
  • Recruitment and selection
  • Appraisal training
  • Managing sickness and absence
  • Risk assessment
  • Health and safety

All-in-all, as long as practice staff are competent and up-to-date and confident about their ability to complete the tasks they need to, all should be well. The above guidelines should provide an outline but, as the CQC says, practices are ultimately responsible for determining what mandatory, and additional, training staff need to meet the needs of their patients.

 

 

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