Coronavirus COVID-19 Courses & Training -Online Coronavirus COVID-19 Courses

The Mandatory Training Group

HDTI Building, Swift Way, Coventry University Technology Park, Coventry, West Midlands, England, United Kingdom, CV1 5FB.

Coronavirus COVID-19 Courses & Training Online

The Mandatory Training Group is the leading UK provider of online training courses, distance learning, accredited eLearning programmes and Ofqual approved qualifications, including public health awareness, health and social care, health and safety, allergen awareness and emergency first aid courses. 

Other online courses and training programmes in The Mandatory Training Group's e-learning catalogue include statutory and mandatory training, health and safety, Microsoft Office, IT and cybersecurity, soft skills development, leadership and management.

Click here to browse MTG E-Learning courses, including online Coronavirus COVID-19 training courses and e-learning programmes.

Coronavirus COVID-19 Courses & Training - Online Coronavirus COVID-19 Courses - The Mandatory Training Group UK - Dr Richard Dune -

Click here to see our CPD Certification Service accreditation for our online Coronavirus COVID-19 training courses and programmes.

The Mandatory Training Group provides a wide range of online training courses, eLearning programmes and Ofqual qualifications, including online Coronavirus COVID-19 training courses in all UK regions, including:

London, Greater London (South East of England) | Birmingham, West Midlands | Glasgow, Scotland | Liverpool, Merseyside (North West) | Bristol, South West England| Manchester, Greater Manchester (North West England) | Sheffield, South Yorkshire (Yorkshire Humber) | Leeds, West Yorkshire (Yorkshire Humber) | Edinburgh, Scotland | Leicester, Leicestershire (East Midlands) | Coventry & Warwickshire (West Midlands) | Bradford, West Yorkshire (Yorkshire Humber) | Cardiff, South Glamorgan (Wales) | Belfast, County Antrim/County Down (Northern Ireland) | Dublin (Republic of Ireland) | Nottingham, Nottinghamshire (East Midlands) | Kingston upon Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire (Yorkshire Humber) | Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne and Wear (North East England) | Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire (West Midlands) | Southampton, Hampshire (South East) | Derby, Derbyshire (East Midlands) | Brighton, East Sussex (South East England) | Portsmouth, Hampshire (South East England) | Plymouth, Devon (South West England) | Northampton, Northamptonshire (East Midlands) | Reading, Berkshire (South East England) | Luton, Bedfordshire (East of England) | Wolverhampton, West Midlands | Bolton, Greater Manchester (North West England) | Aberdeen, Scotland | Bournemouth, Dorset (South West England) | Norwich, Norfolk (East of England) | Swindon, Wiltshire (South West England) | Swansea, West Glamorgan (Wales) | Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire (South East England) | Southend-on-Sea, Essex (East of England) | Middlesbrough, North Yorkshire (Yorkshire Humber) | Peterborough, Cambridgeshire (East of England) | Sunderland, Tyne and Wear (North East England) | Warrington, Cheshire (North West England) | Huddersfield, West Yorkshire (Yorkshire Humber) | Slough, Berkshire (South East England) | Oxford, Oxfordshire (South East England) | York, North Yorkshire (Yorkshire Humber) | Poole, Dorset (South West England) | Ipswich, Suffolk (East of England) | Telford, Shropshire (West Midlands) | Cambridge, Cambridgeshire (East of England) | Dundee, Scotland | Gloucester, Gloucestershire (South West England) | Blackpool, Lancashire (North West England) | Birkenhead, Merseyside (North West England) | Watford, Hertfordshire (East of England) | Sale, Greater Manchester (North West England) | Colchester, Essex (East of England) | Newport, Gwent (Wales) | Solihull, West Midlands | High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire (South East England) | Exeter, Devon (South West England) | Gateshead, Tyne and Wear (North East England) | Blackburn, Lancashire (North West England) | Cheltenham, Gloucestershire (South West England) | Maidstone, Kent (South East England) | Chelmsford, Essex (East of England) | Salford, Greater Manchester (North West England) | Basildon, Essex (East of England) | Doncaster, South Yorkshire (Yorkshire Humber) | Basingstoke, Hampshire (South East England) | Worthing, West Sussex (South East England) | Eastbourne, East Sussex (South East England) | Crawley, West Sussex (South East England) | Rochdale, Greater Manchester (North West England) | Rotherham, South Yorkshire (Yorkshire Humber) | Stockport, Greater Manchester (North West England) | Gillingham, Kent (South East England) | Sutton Coldfield, West Midlands | Woking, Surrey (South East England) | Wigan, Greater Manchester (North West England) | Lincoln, Lincolnshire (East Midlands) | Oldham, Greater Manchester (North West England) | Wakefield, West Yorkshire (Yorkshire Humber) | St Helens, Merseyside (North West England) | Worcester, Worcestershire (West Midlands) | Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire (East of England) | Bath, Somerset (South West England) | Preston, Lancashire (North West England) | Raleigh, Essex (East of England) | Barnsley, South Yorkshire (Yorkshire Humber) | Stevenage, Hertfordshire (East of England) | Hastings, East Sussex (South East England) | Southport, Merseyside (North West England) | Darlington, County Durham (North East England) | Bedford, Bedfordshire (East of England) | Halifax, West Yorkshire (Yorkshire Humber) | Hartlepool, County Durham (North East England) | Chesterfield, Derbyshire (East Midlands) | Nuneaton, Warwickshire (West Midlands) | Grimsby, North East Lincolnshire (Yorkshire Humber) | Weston-super-Mare, Somerset (South West England) | Chester, Cheshire (North West England) | St Albans, Hertfordshire (East of England) | Douglas, Isle of Man | Saint Peter Port, Guernsey | Saint Helier, Jersey | Newport, Isle of Wight | Gibraltar (British Overseas Territory).

Click here to find out more about MTG eLearning courses, including online Coronavirus COVID-19 training courses and training programmes in the UK.

The Mandatory Training Group

One Victoria Square, Birmingham, West Midlands, England, United Kingdom, B1 1BD.

Which Coronavirus COVID-19 Training Courses are Available?

The Mandatory Training Group provides the following online training courses that are related to Coronavirus COVID-19:

  • Free Coronavirus COVID-19 Awareness Training Course
  • Free Coronavirus COVID-19 Awareness Training Course for Healthcare Professionals
  • Infection Prevention and Control Level 1
  • Infection Prevention and Control Level 2
  • Infection Prevention and Control Level 3
  • Health, Safety and Wellbeing at Work.

The Mandatory Training Group

16 Upper Woburn Place, Bloomsbury, London, England, United Kingdom, WC1H 0AF.

What is Coronavirus COVID-19?

A novel coronavirus is a new coronavirus that has not been previously identified. The virus causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is not the same as the coronaviruses that commonly circulate among humans and cause mild illness, like the common cold.

A diagnosis with coronavirus 229E, NL63, OC43, or HKU1 is not the same as a COVID-19 diagnosis. Patients with COVID-19 will be evaluated and cared for differently than patients with common coronavirus diagnosis.

The Mandatory Training Group

Ormond Building, 31-36 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin, Republic of Ireland.

Why is this disease being called coronavirus 2019, COVID-19?

On February 11, 2020 the World Health Organization announced an official name for the disease that is causing the 2019 novel coronavirus outbreak, first identified in Wuhan China. The new name of this disease is coronavirus disease 2019, abbreviated as COVID-19. In COVID-19, ‘CO’ stands for ‘corona,’ ‘VI’ for ‘virus,’ and ‘D’ for disease. Formerly, this disease was referred to as “2019 novel coronavirus” or “2019-nCoV”.

There are many types of human coronaviruses including some that commonly cause mild upper-respiratory tract illnesses. COVID-19 is a new disease, caused be a novel (or new) coronavirus that has not previously been seen in humans. The name of this disease was selected following the World Health Organization (WHO) best practiceexternal icon for naming of new human infectious diseases.

Why might someone blame or avoid individuals and groups (create stigma) because of COVID-19?

People in the U.S. may be worried or anxious about friends and relatives who are living in or visiting areas where COVID-19 is spreading. Some people are worried about the disease. Fear and anxiety can lead to social stigma, for example, towards Chinese or other Asian Americans or people who were in quarantine.

Stigma is discrimination against an identifiable group of people, a place, or a nation. Stigma is associated with a lack of knowledge about how COVID-19 spreads, a need to blame someone, fears about disease and death, and gossip that spreads rumors and myths.

Stigma hurts everyone by creating more fear or anger towards ordinary people instead of the disease that is causing the problem.

How can people help to stop stigma related to COVID-19?

People can fight stigma and help, not hurt, others by providing social support. Counter stigma by learning and sharing facts. Communicating the facts that viruses do not target specific racial or ethnic groups and how COVID-19 actually spreads can help stop stigma.

The Mandatory Training Group

69 Buchanan St, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland, United Kingdom, G1 3HL.

What Causes Coronavirus COVID-19?

What is the source of the virus?

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. Some cause illness in people, and others, such as canine and feline coronaviruses, only infect animals. Rarely, animal coronaviruses that infect animals have emerged to infect people and can spread between people. This is suspected to have occurred for the virus that causes COVID-19. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are two other examples of coronaviruses that originated from animals and then spread to people. More information about the source and spread of COVID-19 is available on the Situation Summary: Source and Spread of the Virus.

How does the virus spread?

This virus was first detected in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China. The first infections were linked to a live animal market, but the virus is now spreading from person-to-person. It’s important to note that person-to-person spread can happen on a continuum. Some viruses are highly contagious (like measles), while other viruses are less so.

The virus that causes COVID-19 seems to be spreading easily and sustainably in the community (“community spread”) in some affected geographic areas. Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.

Learn what is known about the spread of newly emerged coronaviruses.

The Mandatory Training Group

12-16 Bridge Street, 3rd floor, Arnott House, Belfast, County Antrim, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom, BT1 1LU.

Can someone who has COVID-19 spread the illness to others?

The virus that causes COVID-19 is spreading from person-to-person. Someone who is actively sick with COVID-19 can spread the illness to others. That is why CDC recommends that these patients be isolated either in the hospital or at home (depending on how sick they are) until they are better and no longer pose a risk of infecting others.

How long someone is actively sick can vary so the decision on when to release someone from isolation is made on a case-by-case basis in consultation with doctors, infection prevention and control experts, and public health officials and involves considering specifics of each situation including disease severity, illness signs and symptoms, and results of laboratory testing for that patient.

Current CDC guidance for when it is OK to release someone from isolation is made on a case by case basis and includes meeting all of the following requirements:

  • The patient is free from fever without the use of fever-reducing medications.
  • The patient is no longer showing symptoms, including cough.
  • The patient has tested negative on at least two consecutive respiratory specimens collected at least 24 hours apart.

Someone who has been released from isolation is not considered to pose a risk of infection to others.

Can someone who has been quarantined for COVID-19 spread to the illness to others?

Quarantine means separating a person or group of people who have been exposed to a contagious disease but have not developed illness (symptoms) from others who have not been exposed, in order to prevent the possible spread of that disease. Quarantine is usually established for the incubation period of the communicable disease, which is the span of time during which people have developed illness after exposure. For COVID-19, the period of quarantine is 14 days from the last date of exposure, because 14 days is the longest incubation period seen for similar coronaviruses. Someone who has been released from COVID-19 quarantine is not considered a risk for spreading the virus to others because they have not developed illness during the incubation period.

The Mandatory Training Group

Brunel House, 15th Floor, 2 Fitzalan Road, Cardiff, South Glamorgan, Wales, United Kingdom, CF24 0EB.

Can the virus that causes COVID-19 be spread through food, including refrigerated of frozen food?

Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread from person-to-person through respiratory droplets. Currently there is no evidence to support transmission of COVID-19 associated with food. Before preparing or eating food it is important to always wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds for general food safety. Throughout the day wash your hands after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing, or going to the bathroom.

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there is likely very low risk of spread from food products or packaging that are shipped over a period of days or weeks at ambient, refrigerated, or frozen temperatures.

Learn what is known about the spread of COVID-19.

Will warm weather stop the outbreak of COVID-19?

It is not yet known whether weather and temperature impact the spread of COVID-19. Some other viruses, like the common cold and flu, spread more during cold weather months but that does not mean it is impossible to become sick with these viruses during other months. At this time, it is not known whether the spread of COVID-19 will decrease when weather becomes warmer. There is much more to learn about the transmissibility, severity, and other features associated with COVID-19 and investigations are ongoing.

What is community spread?

Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.

The Mandatory Training Group

Horton House, Exchange Flags, Liverpool, Merseyside, England, United Kingdom, L2 3PF.

How Does Coronavirus COVID-19 Spread?

Because it's a new illness, we do not know exactly how coronavirus spreads from person to person.

Similar viruses are spread in cough droplets.

It's very unlikely it can be spread through things like packages or food.

The Mandatory Training Group

Temple Quay, 1 Friary, Bristol, County Bristol, England, United Kingdom, BS1 6EA.

How to Protect Yourself from COVID-19 Coronavirus?

Am I at risk for COVID-19 in the United States?

This is a rapidly evolving situation and the risk assessment may change daily. The latest updates are available on CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) website. 

Has anyone in the United States been infected?

Yes. There have been cases of COVID-19 in the U.S. related to travel and through close contact. U.S. case counts are updated regularly Mondays through Fridays. See the current U.S. case count of COVID-19.

The Mandatory Training Group

Tower Point 44, North Road, Brighton, East Sussex, England, United Kingdom, BN1 1YR.

How can I protect myself?

Visit the COVID-19 Prevention and Treatment page to learn about how to protect yourself from respiratory illnesses, like COVID-19.

What should I do if I had close contact with someone who has COVID-19?

There is information for people who have had close contact with a person confirmed to have, or being evaluated for, COVID-19 available online.

Who its at higher risk for serious illness from COVID-19?

Early information out of China, where COVID-19 first started, shows that some people are at higher risk of getting very sick from this illness including older adults, and people who have serious chronic medical conditions like heart disease, diabetes, and lung disease.

What should people at higher risk of serious illness with COVID-19 do?

If you are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19, you should: stock up on supplies; take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others; when you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick; limit close contact and wash your hands often; and avoid crowds, cruise travel, and non-essential travel. If there is an outbreak in your community, stay home as much as possible. Watch for symptoms and emergency signs. Watch for symptoms and emergency signs. If you get sick, stay home and call your doctor. More information on how to prepare, what to do if you get sick, and how communities and caregivers can support those at higher risk is available on People at Risk for Serious Illness from COVID-19.

The Mandatory Training Group

Wyvern Court Stanier Way, Wyvern Business Park, Derby, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom, DE21 6BF.

Does CDC recommend the use of facemask to prevent COVID-19?

CDC does not recommend that people who are well wear a facemask to protect themselves from respiratory illnesses, including COVID-19. You should only wear a mask if a healthcare professional recommends it. A facemask should be used by people who have COVID-19 and are showing symptoms. This is to protect others from the risk of getting infected. The use of facemasks also is crucial for health workers and other people who are taking care of someone infected with COVID-19 in close settings (at home or in a health care facility). 

Am I at risk for COVID-19 from a package or products shipping from China?

There is still a lot that is unknown about the newly emerged COVID-19 and how it spreads. Two other coronaviruses have emerged previously to cause severe illness in people (MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV). The virus that causes COVID-19 is more genetically related to SARS-CoV than MERS-CoV, but both are betacoronaviruses with their origins in bats. While we don’t know for sure that this virus will behave the same way as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, we can use the information gained from both of these earlier coronaviruses to guide us. In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there is likely very low risk of spread from products or packaging that are shipped over a period of days or weeks at ambient temperatures. Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread most often by respiratory droplets. Currently there is no evidence to support transmission of COVID-19 associated with imported goods and there have not been any cases of COVID-19 in the United States associated with imported goods. Information will be provided on the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) website as it becomes available.

The Mandatory Training Group

53 Fountain St, Manchester, Greater Manchester, England, United Kingdom, M2 2AN.

How is Coronavirus COVID-19 Diagnosed?

What are the symptoms and complications that COVID-19 can cause?

Current symptoms reported for patients with COVID-19 have included mild to severe respiratory illness with fever1, cough, and difficulty breathing. Read about COVID-19 Symptoms.

Should I be tested for COVID-19?

If you develop symptoms such as fever, cough, and/or difficulty breathing, and have been in close contact with a person known to have COVID-19 or have recently traveled from an area with ongoing spread of COVID-19, stay home and call your healthcare provider. Older patients and individuals who have severe underlying medical conditions or are immunocompromised should contact their healthcare provider early, even if their illness is mild. If you have severe symptoms, such as persistent pain or pressure in the chest, new confusion or inability to arouse, or bluish lips of face, contact your healthcare provider or emergency room and seek care immediately. Your doctor will determine if you have signs and symptoms of COVID-19 and whether you should be tested.

Can a person test negative and later test positive for COVID-19?

Using the CDC-developed diagnostic test, a negative result means that the virus that causes COVID-19 was not found in the person’s sample. In the early stages of infection, it is possible the virus will not be detected.

The Mandatory Training Group

Mitchell Way, Southampton, Hampshire, England, United Kingdom, SO18 2XU.

Why might someone blame or avoid individuals and groups (create stigma) because of COVID-19?

People in the U.S. may be worried or anxious about friends and relatives who are living in or visiting areas where COVID-19 is spreading. Some people are worried about the disease. Fear and anxiety can lead to social stigma, for example, towards Chinese or other Asian Americans or people who were in quarantine.

Stigma is discrimination against an identifiable group of people, a place, or a nation. Stigma is associated with a lack of knowledge about how COVID-19 spreads, a need to blame someone, fears about disease and death, and gossip that spreads rumors and myths.

Stigma hurts everyone by creating more fear or anger towards ordinary people instead of the disease that is causing the problem.

How can people help to stop stigma related to COVID-19?

People can fight stigma and help, not hurt, others by providing social support. Counter stigma by learning and sharing facts. Communicating the facts that viruses do not target specific racial or ethnic groups and how COVID-19 actually spreads can help stop stigma.

What should healthcare professionals and health departments do?

For recommendations and guidance on persons under investigation; infection control, including personal protective equipment guidance; home care and isolation; and case investigation, see Information for Healthcare Professionals. For information on specimen collection and shipment, see Information for Laboratories. For information for public health professional on COVID-19, see Information for Public Health Professionals.

The Mandatory Training Group

7th Floor, The Balance, 2 Pinfold St, Sheffield City Centre, Sheffield, Sout Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom, S1 2GU.

How is Coronavirus COVID-19 Treated?

There’s currently no treatment specifically approved for COVID-19, and no cure for an infection, although treatments and vaccines are currently under study. Instead, treatment focuses on managing symptoms as the virus runs its course.

Seek immediate medical help if you think you have COVID-19. Your doctor will recommend treatment for any symptoms or complications that develop.

Other coronaviruses like SARS and MERS do have vaccines and treatments. Some treatments for these similar viruses include:

  • antiviral or retroviral medications
  • breathing support, such as mechanical ventilation
  • steroids to reduce lung swelling
  • blood plasma transfusions.

The Mandatory Training Group

Princes Exchange, Ground, First and Second, Leeds, West Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom, LS1 4HY.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Coronavirus COVID-19 Training Courses

Here at The Mandatory Training Group, we receive many questions relating to the online Coronavirus COVID-19 training courses. The most common questions and answers about the online Coronavirus COVID-19 courses and training are outlined below.

What is a coronavirus?

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses which may cause illness in animals or humans. In humans, several coronaviruses are known to cause respiratory infections ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). The most recently discovered coronavirus causes coronavirus disease COVID-19.

What is COVID-19?

COVID-19 is an infectious disease caused by the most recently discovered coronavirus. This new virus and disease were unknown before the outbreak began in Wuhan, China, in December 2019.

The Mandatory Training Group

Etruria Rd, Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, England, United Kingdom, ST1 5NH.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are fever, tiredness, and dry cough. Some patients may have aches and pains, nasal congestion, runny nose, sore throat or diarrhea. These symptoms are usually mild and begin gradually. Some people become infected but don’t develop any symptoms and don't feel unwell. Most people (about 80%) recover from the disease without needing special treatment. Around 1 out of every 6 people who gets COVID-19 becomes seriously ill and develops difficulty breathing. Older people, and those with underlying medical problems like high blood pressure, heart problems or diabetes, are more likely to develop serious illness. People with fever, cough and difficulty breathing should seek medical attention.

How does COVID-19 spread?

People can catch COVID-19 from others who have the virus. The disease can spread from person to person through small droplets from the nose or mouth which are spread when a person with COVID-19 coughs or exhales. These droplets land on objects and surfaces around the person. Other people then catch COVID-19 by touching these objects or surfaces, then touching their eyes, nose or mouth. People can also catch COVID-19 if they breathe in droplets from a person with COVID-19 who coughs out or exhales droplets. This is why it is important to stay more than 1 meter (3 feet) away from a person who is sick.

WHO is assessing ongoing research on the ways COVID-19 is spread and will continue to share updated findings.

Can the virus that causes COVID-19 be transmitted through the air?
Studies to date suggest that the virus that causes COVID-19 is mainly transmitted through contact with respiratory droplets rather than through the air. See previous answer on “How does COVID-19 spread?”

Can CoVID-19 be caught from a person who has no symptoms?

The main way the disease spreads is through respiratory droplets expelled by someone who is coughing. The risk of catching COVID-19 from someone with no symptoms at all is very low. However, many people with COVID-19 experience only mild symptoms. This is particularly true at the early stages of the disease. It is therefore possible to catch COVID-19 from someone who has, for example, just a mild cough and does not feel ill. WHO is assessing ongoing research on the period of transmission of COVID-19 and will continue to share updated findings.

Can I catch COVID-19 from the feces of someone with the disease?

The risk of catching COVID-19 from the feces of an infected person appears to be low. While initial investigations suggest the virus may be present in feces in some cases, spread through this route is not a main feature of the outbreak. WHO is assessing ongoing research on the ways COVID-19 is spread and will continue to share new findings. Because this is a risk, however, it is another reason to clean hands regularly, after using the bathroom and before eating.

The Mandatory Training Group

Rotterdam House, 116 Quayside, Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne and Wear, England, United Kingdom, NE1 3DY.

What can I do to protect myself and prevent the spread of disease?

Protection measures for everyone

Stay aware of the latest information on the COVID-19 outbreak, available on the WHO website and through your national and local public health authority. Many countries around the world have seen cases of COVID-19 and several have seen outbreaks. Authorities in China and some other countries have succeeded in slowing or stopping their outbreaks. However, the situation is unpredictable so check regularly for the latest news.

You can reduce your chances of being infected or spreading COVID-19 by taking some simple precautions:

Regularly and thoroughly clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water.
Why? Washing your hands with soap and water or using alcohol-based hand rub kills viruses that may be on your hands.
Maintain at least 1 metre (3 feet) distance between yourself and anyone who is coughing or sneezing.
Why? When someone coughs or sneezes they spray small liquid droplets from their nose or mouth which may contain virus. If you are too close, you can breathe in the droplets, including the COVID-19 virus if the person coughing has the disease.
Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
Why? Hands touch many surfaces and can pick up viruses. Once contaminated, hands can transfer the virus to your eyes, nose or mouth. From there, the virus can enter your body and can make you sick.
Make sure you, and the people around you, follow good respiratory hygiene. This means covering your mouth and nose with your bent elbow or tissue when you cough or sneeze. Then dispose of the used tissue immediately.
Why? Droplets spread virus. By following good respiratory hygiene you protect the people around you from viruses such as cold, flu and COVID-19.
Stay home if you feel unwell. If you have a fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical attention and call in advance. Follow the directions of your local health authority.
Why? National and local authorities will have the most up to date information on the situation in your area. Calling in advance will allow your health care provider to quickly direct you to the right health facility. This will also protect you and help prevent spread of viruses and other infections.
Keep up to date on the latest COVID-19 hotspots (cities or local areas where COVID-19 is spreading widely). If possible, avoid traveling to places – especially if you are an older person or have diabetes, heart or lung disease.
Why? You have a higher chance of catching COVID-19 in one of these areas.

Protection measures for persons who are in or have recently visited (past 14 days) areas where COVID-19 is spreading

Follow the guidance outlined above (Protection measures for everyone)
Self-isolate by staying at home if you begin to feel unwell, even with mild symptoms such as headache, low grade fever (37.3 C or above) and slight runny nose, until you recover. If it is essential for you to have someone bring you supplies or to go out, e.g. to buy food, then wear a mask to avoid infecting other people.
Why? Avoiding contact with others and visits to medical facilities will allow these facilities to operate more effectively and help protect you and others from possible COVID-19 and other viruses.
If you develop fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical advice promptly as this may be due to a respiratory infection or other serious condition. Call in advance and tell your provider of any recent travel or contact with travelers.
Why? Calling in advance will allow your health care provider to quickly direct you to the right health facility. This will also help to prevent possible spread of COVID-19 and other viruses.

How likely am I to catch COVID-19?

The risk depends on where you are - and more specifically, whether there is a COVID-19 outbreak unfolding there.

For most people in most locations the risk of catching COVID-19 is still low. However, there are now places around the world (cities or areas) where the disease is spreading. For people living in, or visiting, these areas the risk of catching COVID-19 is higher. Governments and health authorities are taking vigorous action every time a new case of COVID-19 is identified. Be sure to comply with any local restrictions on travel, movement or large gatherings. Cooperating with disease control efforts will reduce your risk of catching or spreading COVID-19.

COVID-19 outbreaks can be contained and transmission stopped, as has been shown in China and some other countries. Unfortunately, new outbreaks can emerge rapidly. It’s important to be aware of the situation where you are or intend to go. WHO publishes daily updates on the COVID-19 situation worldwide.

You can see these at https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/situation-reports/ 

The Mandatory Training Group

Norwich House, 1st floor, Savile Street, Kingston Upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom, HU1 3ES.

Should I worry about COVID-19?

Illness due to COVID-19 infection is generally mild, especially for children and young adults. However, it can cause serious illness: about 1 in every 5 people who catch it need hospital care. It is therefore quite normal for people to worry about how the COVID-19 outbreak will affect them and their loved ones.

We can channel our concerns into actions to protect ourselves, our loved ones and our communities. First and foremost among these actions is regular and thorough hand-washing and good respiratory hygiene. Secondly, keep informed and follow the advice of the local health authorities including any restrictions put in place on travel, movement and gatherings.
Learn more about how to protect yourself at https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public

Who is at risk of developing severe illness?

While we are still learning about how COVID-2019 affects people, older persons and persons with pre-existing medical conditions (such as high blood pressure, heart disease, lung disease, cancer or diabetes) appear to develop serious illness more often than others.

Are antibiotics effective in preventing or treating the COVID-19?

No. Antibiotics do not work against viruses, they only work on bacterial infections. COVID-19 is caused by a virus, so antibiotics do not work. Antibiotics should not be used as a means of prevention or treatment of COVID-19. They should only be used as directed by a physician to treat a bacterial infection.

Are there any medicines or therapies that can prevent or cure COVID-19?

While some western, traditional or home remedies may provide comfort and alleviate symptoms of COVID-19, there is no evidence that current medicine can prevent or cure the disease. WHO does not recommend self-medication with any medicines, including antibiotics, as a prevention or cure for COVID-19. However, there are several ongoing clinical trials that include both western and traditional medicines. WHO will continue to provide updated information as soon as clinical findings are available.

The Mandatory Training Group

Milton Street, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England, United Kingdom, NG1 3PZ.

Is there a vaccine, drug or treatment for COVID-19?

Not yet. To date, there is no vaccine and no specific antiviral medicine to prevent or treat COVID-2019. However, those affected should receive care to relieve symptoms. People with serious illness should be hospitalized. Most patients recover thanks to supportive care.

Possible vaccines and some specific drug treatments are under investigation. They are being tested through clinical trials. WHO is coordinating efforts to develop vaccines and medicines to prevent and treat COVID-19.

The most effective ways to protect yourself and others against COVID-19 are to frequently clean your hands, cover your cough with the bend of elbow or tissue, and maintain a distance of at least 1 meter (3 feet) from people who are coughing or sneezing. (See Basic protective measures against the new coronavirus).

Is COVID-19 the same as SARS?

No. The virus that causes COVID-19 and the one that caused the outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in 2003 are related to each other genetically, but the diseases they cause are quite different.

SARS was more deadly but much less infectious than COVID-19. There have been no outbreaks of SARS anywhere in the world since 2003.

Should I wear a mask to protect myself?

Only wear a mask if you are ill with COVID-19 symptoms (especially coughing) or looking after someone who may have COVID-19. Disposable face mask can only be used once. If you are not ill or looking after someone who is ill then you are wasting a mask. There is a world-wide shortage of masks, so WHO urges people to use masks wisely.

WHO advises rational use of medical masks to avoid unnecessary wastage of precious resources and mis-use of masks (see Advice on the use of masks).

The most effective ways to protect yourself and others against COVID-19 are to frequently clean your hands, cover your cough with the bend of elbow or tissue and maintain a distance of at least 1 meter (3 feet) from people who are coughing or sneezing. See basic protective measures against the new coronavirus for more information.

How to put on, use, take off and dispose of a mask?

  1. Remember, a mask should only be used by health workers, care takers, and individuals with respiratory symptoms, such as fever and cough.
  2. Before touching the mask, clean hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or soap and water
  3. Take the mask and inspect it for tears or holes.
  4. Orient which side is the top side (where the metal strip is).
  5. Ensure the proper side of the mask faces outwards (the coloured side).
  6. Place the mask to your face. Pinch the metal strip or stiff edge of the mask so it moulds to the shape of your nose.
  7. Pull down the mask’s bottom so it covers your mouth and your chin.
  8. After use, take off the mask; remove the elastic loops from behind the ears while keeping the mask away from your face and clothes, to avoid touching potentially contaminated surfaces of the mask.
  9. Discard the mask in a closed bin immediately after use.
  10. Perform hand hygiene after touching or discarding the mask – Use alcohol-based hand rub or, if visibly soiled, wash your hands with soap and water.

The Mandatory Training Group

Vicar Lane, Bradford, West Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom, BD1 5LD.

How long is the incubation period for COVID-19?

The “incubation period” means the time between catching the virus and beginning to have symptoms of the disease. Most estimates of the incubation period for COVID-19 range from 1-14 days, most commonly around five days. These estimates will be updated as more data become available.

Can humans become infected with the COVID-19 from an animal source?

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that are common in animals. Occasionally, people get infected with these viruses which may then spread to other people. For example, SARS-CoV was associated with civet cats and MERS-CoV is transmitted by dromedary camels. Possible animal sources of COVID-19 have not yet been confirmed.

To protect yourself, such as when visiting live animal markets, avoid direct contact with animals and surfaces in contact with animals. Ensure good food safety practices at all times. Handle raw meat, milk or animal organs with care to avoid contamination of uncooked foods and avoid consuming raw or undercooked animal products.

Can I catch COVID-19 from my pet?

While there has been one instance of a dog being infected in Hong Kong, to date, there is no evidence that a dog, cat or any pet can transmit COVID-19. COVID-19 is mainly spread through droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or speaks. To protect yourself, clean your hands frequently and thoroughly.

WHO continues to monitor the latest research on this and other COVID-19 topics and will update as new findings are available.

How long does the virus survive on surfaces?

It is not certain how long the virus that causes COVID-19 survives on surfaces, but it seems to behave like other coronaviruses. Studies suggest that coronaviruses (including preliminary information on the COVID-19 virus) may persist on surfaces for a few hours or up to several days. This may vary under different conditions (e.g. type of surface, temperature or humidity of the environment).

If you think a surface may be infected, clean it with simple disinfectant to kill the virus and protect yourself and others. Clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water. Avoid touching your eyes, mouth, or nose.

Is it safe to receive a package from any area where COVID-19 has been reported?

Yes. The likelihood of an infected person contaminating commercial goods is low and the risk of catching the virus that causes COVID-19 from a package that has been moved, travelled, and exposed to different conditions and temperature is also low.

Is there anything I should not do?

The following measures ARE NOT effective against COVID-2019 and can be harmful:

  • Smoking
  • Wearing multiple masks
  • Taking antibiotics (See question 10 "Are there any medicines of therapies that can prevent or cure COVID-19?")

In any case, if you have fever, cough and difficulty breathing seek medical care early to reduce the risk of developing a more severe infection and be sure to share your recent travel history with your health care provider.

The Mandatory Training Group

9-10 St. Andrew Square, Edinburgh, County Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom, EH2 2AF.

Where do I find more information about Coronavirus COVID-19?

You can find out more information about Coronavirus COVID-19 from reputable organisations, including:

The World Health Organisation (2020) - Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak.

The World Health Organisation (2020) - International travel and health.

BBC News - Coronavirus symptoms: What are they and how do I protect myself?

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2020) - 2019-nCoV Frequently Asked Questions and Answers.

Deloitte Insights (2020) - The economic impact of COVID-19.

GOV.UK (2020) - COVID-19: epidemiology, virology and clinical features.

MAYO Clinic (2020) - Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) - Diagnosis and treatment.

NBC News- Coronavirus diseases: Comparing COVID-19, SARS and MERS by the numbers.

NHS (2020) - Coronavirus (COVID-19).

NHS England (2020) - Standard operating procedure for Coronavirus Priority Assessment Pods (version 1).

Public Health England (2020) - Total UK cases COVID-19 Cases Update https://www.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/f94c3c90da5b4e9f9a0b19484dd4bb14

Sky News - Coronavirus: Do masks protect you? Will summer save us? Busting COVID-19 myths.

Sky News - Coronavirus: Woman is first UK patient to die after testing positive for COVID-19.

South China Morning Post (2020) - Coronavirus: the new disease Covid-19 explained.

UN News (2020) - Coronavirus emergency: here’s what we know so far

WIRED UK (2020) - Does alcohol kill coronavirus? The biggest myths, busted.

World Health Organisation (2020) - Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) advice for the public: Myth busters.

World Health Organisation (2020) - Naming the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and the virus that causes it.

World Health Organisation (2020)  - Report of the WHO-China Joint Mission on Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2020) - About Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19).

Gov.UK (2020) - Coronavirus (COVID-19): UK government response.

NHS 111 Online (2020) - About coronavirus (COVID-19).

NHS England (2020) - Coronavirus (COVID-19).

World Health Organisation (2020) - Coronavirus.

World Health Organisation (2020) - Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) advice for the public.

World Health Organisation (2020) - Current novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.

World Health Organisation (2020) - Q&A on coronaviruses (COVID-19).

The Mandatory Training Group

3rd Floor, St. George's House, 6 St George's Way, Leicester, Leicestershire, England, United Kingdom, LE1 1QZ.

Why complete your online Coronavirus COVID-19 training with The Mandatory Training Group?

The Mandatory Training Group is the leading provider of accredited online Coronavirus COVID-19 training courses.

Contact our Coventry based Support Team on 024 7610 0090 or via Email to discuss how we can help your organisation with online Coronavirus COVID-19 training courses for your organisation.

The Mandatory Training Group

HDTI Building, Swift Way, Coventry University Technology Park, Coventry, West Midlands, England, United Kingdom, CV1 5FB.

Coronavirus COVID-19 Courses & Training - Online Coronavirus COVID-19 Courses - The Mandatory Training Group UK.

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