FREE Sepsis Awareness Training Course - CPDUK Accredited E-Learning - Online Sepsis Awareness Course.

The Sepsis Trust estimates that sepsis kills 52,000 people annually in the UK. However, it is important to note sepsis is treatable, lives can be saved and outcomes improved for sepsis survivors. A quarter of patients with sepsis in the UK wait longer than the recommended time for appropriate treatment, thus putting patients at higher risk of avoidable deaths.

Sepsis awareness campaigns and sepsis survivors support initiatives have been undertaken by Sepsis Trust, NHS England and other organisations. It is also essential to educate healthcare and social care professionals in both primary care and secondary services. 

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What is sepsis? 

Sepsis is the body’s overwhelming and life-threatening response to infection that can lead to tissue damage, multiple organ failure, and even death if not treated quickly.

Medically, sepsis is the body’s immune system over-responding to an infection.

Sepsis awareness - facts and statistics

Sepsis deaths recorded in UK hospitals have risen by more than a third in two years, according to data collected by leading healthcare safety experts. Worryingly, for many people, sepsis is diagnosed early, resulting in serious complications and sometimes avoidable deaths.

Here are some key facts about sepsis: 

  • In the UK, Sepsis affects around 250, 000 people annually,
  • Approximately 52,000 people die from sepsis every year,
  • Worldwide, more than six million people die from sepsis annually,
  • Most sepsis complications and deaths can be avoided,
  • UK sepsis deaths are higher than comparable European countries,
  • According to NHS England, sepsis diagnosis is increasing,
  • Staff shortages and overcrowding on wards are partly to blame, and
  • Lack of awareness of sepsis and delayed treatments have been identified as significant contributory causes.

Sepsis: early diagnosis and treatment is the key

Due to its devastating effects, sepsis has been dubbed the 'hidden killer'. Barely a week passes without news of people who have lost limbs, suffered multiple organ failure or even died from sepsis. 

NHS England, The Sepsis Trust and other organisations have run various campaigns to improve sepsis awareness. Early diagnosis and treatment of sepsis is the key to improving survival rates and also better outcomes for sepsis survivors. Most importantly, it is essential to improve sepsis understanding amongst health and social care workers at all levels. There is no single definitive test or obvious symptom for sepsis, therefore an awareness of what to look out for is essential.

Complete the survey by clicking the red button below to receive a FREE Sepsis Awareness Course!

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What are the signs and symptoms of sepsis?

Signs and symptoms of sepsis can include:

  • A fever, shivering or feeling very cold,
  • High heart rate - more than 90 minutes/minute,
  • Rapid rate of breathing - higher than 20 breaths per minute.

Typically, there is a probable or confirmed infection and any of these symptoms before sepsis can be diagnosed. It is essential to urgently get medical help whenever sepsis is suspected.

If treatment is delayed, sepsis can lead to septic shock, causing abnormalities in cellular metabolism and very low blood pressure. This may result in death.

Prevention and early treatment of sepsis

Early, aggressive treatment of sepsis improves the chances of survival. Some patients with sepsis or septic shock may require lifesaving measures to stabilise breathing and heart function. 

People already in hospital or recently had surgery are particularly at risk of sepsis because of another illness. Young children and older adults are also at higher risk of sepsis. The three general approaches to preventing and reducing the risk of infections that lead to sepsis, include:

  • Managing long term conditions and getting vaccinated against any potential infections such as flu and pneumonia,
  • Adopting good hygiene practices such as proper hand-washing and keeping any wounds and cuts clean to prevent infection, and
  • Seeking immediate medical help if you notice signs of sepsis.

Free Sepsis Awareness Training Course

Complete the short survey below to receive access to a free awareness of sepsis course developed by The Mandatory Training Group and LearnPac Systems.

Complete the survey by clicking the red button below to receive a FREE Sepsis Awareness Course!

Go to survey 

Sepsis Awareness Training Course - CPDUK Accredited E-Learning - Online Sepsis Awareness Training.

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