What is the First Aid Treatment for Hyperglycaemia?

Every day, 65 people in the UK die early as a result of diabetes. Therefore, it is important to know how to help a diabetic whose life is in danger. So, what should you do when you have hyperglycaemia or also known as diabetes?

This blog will discuss the importance of first aid for hyperglycaemia and how to recognise high or low blood sugar and its causes.

What is hyperglycaemia?

Hyperglycemia, the term for expressing high blood sugar, has been defined by the World Health Organisation as:

  • Blood glucose levels greater than 7.0 mmol/L (126 mg/dl) when fasting
  • Blood glucose levels greater than 11.0 mmol/L (200 mg/dl) 2 hours after meals.

Although blood sugar levels exceeding 7 mmol/L for extended periods can start to cause damage to internal organs, symptoms may not develop until blood glucose levels exceed 11 mmol/L.

What causes hyperglycemia?

The underlying cause of hyperglycemia will usually be from the loss of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas or if the body develops insulin resistance.

More immediate reasons for hyperglycemia include:

  • Missing a dose of diabetic medication, tablets or insulin
  • Eating more carbohydrates than your body and/or medication can manage
  • Being mentally or emotionally stressed (injury, surgery or anxiety)
  • Contracting an infection.

How do you recognise high and low blood sugar?

Knowing and understanding the symptoms of high and low blood sugar should be essential for both diabetics and their friends and families. There are several reasons why your blood sugar levels may be too high.

Symptoms of high blood sugar

Hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar, is common amongst diabetics. Being aware of the following symptoms and staying alert for their presence, whether you are a diabetic or a family member or friend, should be essential:

  • Need for frequent urination
  • Drowsiness
  • Nausea
  • Extreme hunger or thirst
  • The blurring of the vision.

Symptoms of low blood sugar

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, occurs when a diabetic has not eaten enough food or has too much insulin within his or her body. Being aware of the following symptoms and staying alert for their presence, whether you are a diabetic or a family member or friend, should be essential:

  • Shaking
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Sweating
  • Anxiety
  • Dizziness
  • Extreme hunger
  • Weakness and tiredness
  • Irritability.

What is the first aid treatment for hyperglycaemia?

The first aid treatment for hyperglycaemia.

  • Sit them down and give them a sugary drink, or glucose sweets (not a diet drink).
  • If they begin to feel better, give more drinks and some food, particularly biscuits or bread to sustain their blood sugar – a jam sandwich is great.
  • In case they don’t feel better within 10 minutes or they begin to get worse, phone the emergency services.
  • If they lose consciousness but are breathing, put into the recovery position and phone the emergency services.
  • If they stop breathing, prepare to give CPR.

Do not attempt to give an unconscious casualty anything to eat or drink. And never give them insulin as this will further lower their blood sugar and could kill them.

How to avoid and deal with hyperglycemia?

Testing your blood sugar levels regularly can help you spot the signs of hyperglycaemia. But there are some steps you can take to either prevent a hyper from happening or to bring down your blood sugar levels.

  • You can start by making sure you are aware of your carbohydrate portions and how they may be affecting your blood sugar levels after eating.
  • Avoid foods that have a high glycemic index (GI) and choose low GI foods that can help manage your blood sugar levels more effectively.
  • Increase the fibre in your diet.
  • Try to maintain a healthy weight as this promotes regular blood sugar levels in the body.
  • Remember to take your insulin and other diabetes medication, and always take them correctly.
  • Concentrate on your emotional well-being, get a quality night’s sleep and find ways to manage your stress.

If your blood sugar levels continue to be high, or you’re unsure of what to do, contact your doctor for further guidance.

Where can I find online first aid training courses for hyperglycaemia treatment?

The Mandatory Training Group is the leading UK provider of accredited online first aid training courses for hyperglycaemia treatment for all sectors, including health and social care, education, local government, private companies, charitable and third sector organisations.

Alternatively, you can contact our helpful Support Team clicking here to tell us your online first aid training courses for hyperglycaemia treatment.

Online first aid training courses for hyperglycaemia treatment 

What our clients say...

Frequently asked questions and answers about first aid training courses for hyperglycaemia treatment

Here at The Mandatory Training Group, we receive many questions about online first aid training courses for hyperglycaemia treatment. We have selected a few of these questions and answered them below.

Contact us

Still have some questions which you would like us to help you with?

Free First Aid Treatment for Diabetes - E-learning Course - The Mandatory Training Group UK -

What is the First Aid Treatment for Hyperglycaemia? - The Mandatory Training Group UK.

Just added to your wishlist:
My Wishlist
You've just added this product to the cart:
Go to Basket

#title#

#price#
×
Sale

Unavailable

Sold Out