What is the Difference Between Angina and a Heart Attack?

Can you recognise when someone has angina or perhaps a heart attack? How does angina treatment differ from the treatment for a heart attack?

This article will discuss the distinction between angina and heart attack and their specific treatment.

What is the distinction between angina and heart attack?

Angina, also called angina pectoris, is chest pain caused by reduced blood flow to the heart muscles. It's not usually life-threatening, but it's a warning sign that you could be at risk of a heart attack or stroke.

A heart attack, also known as myocardial infarction or MI, is a severe medical emergency in which the supply of oxygenated blood to the heart is suddenly blocked.

What are the common signs and symptoms of angina?

The common signs and symptoms of angina include:

  • Chest pain and discomfort, possibly described as pressure, squeezing, burning or fullness
  • Pain in the arms, neck, jaw, shoulder or back
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Fatigue
  • Shortness of breath
  • Sweating.

What are the common signs and symptoms of a heart attack?

The common signs and symptoms of a heart attack include:

  • Chest pain - A sensation of pressure, tightness or squeezing in the centre of your chest
  • Pain in other parts of the body - It can feel as if the pain is travelling from your chest to your arms (usually the left arm is affected, but it can affect both arms), jaw, neck, back and tummy (abdomen)
  • Feeling lightheaded or dizzy
  • Sweating
  • Shortness of breath
  • Feeling sick (nausea) or being sick (vomiting)
  • An overwhelming sense of anxiety (similar to having a panic attack)
  • Coughing or wheezing.

How do you treat angina?

If you are experiencing symptoms of angina, you should:

  • Stop, relax, and rest.
  • Lie down if you can.
  • Calm yourself by focusing on your breathing. Breathe in through the nose and breathe out slowly from the mouth.
  • Take nitroglycerine.
  • If the pain or discomfort does not stop a few minutes after taking nitroglycerin or your symptoms become more severe, call 911 or let someone know that you need immediate medical assistance.

How do you treat a heart attack?

While waiting for an ambulance, it may help to chew and then swallow an aspirin tablet (ideally 300mg), as long as the person having a heart attack is not allergic to aspirin. Aspirin helps to thin the blood and improves blood flow to the heart. In a hospital, treatment for a heart attack depends on how serious it is. The two treatments are:

  • Medication - To dissolve blood clots
  • Surgery - To help restore blood to the heart.

Where can I find online angina and a heart attack training courses and qualifications?

The Mandatory Training Group is the leading UK provider of accredited statutory and mandatory training courses for all sectors, including health and social care, education, local government, private companies, charitable and third sector organisations.

Alternatively, you can contact our helpful Support Team byclicking hereto tell us your online angina and a heart attack training courses and qualifications.

Online angina and a heart attack training courses and qualifications

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Frequently asked questions about angina and a heart attack

Here at The Mandatory Training Group, we receive many questions about the statutory and mandatory training courses for angina and a heart attack. We have selected a few of these questions and answered them below.

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What is the Difference Between Angina and a Heart Attack? - The Mandatory Training Group UK -

What is the Difference Between Angina and a Heart Attack? - The Mandatory Training Group UK.

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